Facebook translates privacy policy for non-legal experts

facebook privacyFacebook’s never exactly been revered for its privacy policy. Loathed seems like a more accurate description. And it looks like it’s been taking stock of constant complaints over its security holes and has simplified its privacy guidelines so that criticism can no longer be attributed to naivety.

The social network has made no changes to its privacy policy, instead just cutting the legal jargon and putting the document in very, very plain English for its billions of users. Prior to the revamp, the manuscript was admittedly “longer than the US constitution – without the amendments.” So while the policy is still the work of various legal experts and lawyers, it’s now labeled under headings like “How advertising works,” and “How we share your information.” While it’s much more succinct than its predecessor, still prepare yourself for a lengthy read if you plan to wade through the entire thing.

According to the Wall Street Journal, privacy and product counsel for Facebook Edward Palmieri decided the social network needed to apply its simple, clean cut element to its privacy policy. For one, this will make reviewing the guidelines a less intimidating process. Secondly, users may not be so quick to point a finger at Facebook. “We struggled with really hitting home to users that we do not sell their data to advertisers,” he explains.

Facebook has often found itself the center of scrutiny what it does with user information, and has faced direct consumer calls for stronger security as well as questions from Congress. Users have complained that the former document was impossible to interpret without a lawyer, and Facebook is directly acknowledging this. “We agree that privacy policies can and should be more easily understood, and that inspired us to try something different.” And while Facebook hasn’t amended its policy, it breaks down exactly how it accumulates user data and where it goes from there.

This is currently a work in process, and one that hasn’t been officially adopted as part of the permanent Facebook handbook. It’s admittedly more user friendly, but something tells us Facebook is going to continue to find itself mired in privacy concerns. But now its accusers will be better informed.

Mobile

Updating to Apple’s iOS 12 will make your iPhone a whole lot smarter

iOS 12, the latest version of Apple’s iOS, is officially here. We took it for a spin to check out its new noteworthy features, and if it truly changes our smartphone habits for the better.
Smart Home

Facebook’s new Portal device can collect your data to target your ads

Facebook confirmed that its new Portal smart displays, designed to enable Messenger-enabled video calls, technically have the capability to gather data on users via the camera and mic onboard.
Mobile

Hinge's new feature wants to know who you've gone out on dates with

With its new "We Met" feature, Hinge wants to learn how your dates are going with matches in its app. That way, it can inject the information into its algorithm to provide future recommendations that better suit its users' preferences.
Computing

Was your Facebook account hacked in the latest breach? Here’s how to find out

Facebook now reports that its latest data breach affected only 30 million users, down from an initial estimate of 50 million accounts. You can also find out if hackers had accessed your account by visiting a dedicated portal.
Social Media

These are the best ways to make an animated GIF

Love sharing GIFs with your friends and peers, but wish you could make your own? Here's how to do so in Photoshop, or using a few other methods that don't require you to shell out a premium fee with each calendar year.
Social Media

Instagram says its A.I. can track down bullying in photos

Instagram is turning to artificial intelligence to help it root out bullying on its platform. Following similar efforts to target bullying in comments, the company now has systems capable of detecting bullying in photos, too.
Social Media

Snapchat is using VR to let you step inside its new original shows

Tuning in to your favorite shows not enough? Snap Originals will allow viewers to set into a virtual set. The new exclusive shows debut today with three different shows. Snap Originals are vertical, short, and exclusive to the platform.
Social Media

3D Facebook photos jump out of the newsfeed, no glasses needed

You're not seeing things -- that photo in your Facebook newsfeed is 3D. Launching today, 3D Facebook Photos use the depth maps from dual-lens smartphones to add dimension to an image as you move your phone.
Social Media

Instagram is testing a new way for you to look through your feed

Instagram is constantly tweaking its app to help give its users the best experience possible, so how do you like the sound of tapping — instead of swiping — to look through your feed?
Social Media

Like a pocketable personal stylist, Pinterest overhauls shopping tools

Pinterest shopping just got a bit better with a trio of updates now rolling out to Pinterest. The first replaces Buyable Pins with Product Pins for more features, including knowing whether or not a product is in stock.
Social Media

YouTube is back after crashing for users around the world

It's rare to see YouTube suffer serious issues, but the site went down around the world for a period of time on October 16. It's back now, and we can confirm it's loading normally on desktop and mobile.
Social Media

Twitter has sorted out those weird notifications it was sending

Twitter started churning out weird notifications of seemingly nonsensical letters and numbers to many of its users on Tuesday morning. The bizarre incident even prompted Twitter boss Jack Dorsey to get involved.
Photography

Adobe MAX 2018: What it is, why it matters, and what to expect

Each year, Adobe uses its Adobe MAX conference to show off its latest apps, technologies, and tools to help simplify and improve the workflow of creatives the world over. Here's what you should expect from this year's conference.
Home Theater

Facebook might be planning a streaming box for your TV that watches you back

Facebook is reportedly working on a piece of streaming media hardware for your living room with a built-in camera for video calls, something people may not want given the company's recent controversies.