A safer Twitter may be around the corner thanks to API guidelines, restrictions

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Twitter is continuing to crack down on abuse on its platform, and to that end, has taken a closer look at its API and those using it. Third-party developers have historically been able to leverage the Twitter API in order to build apps and other software that work with the social media company. But now, those who want to access the API will have to undergo a more comprehensive vetting process in hopes of keeping out folks who may want to spam or otherwise abuse Twitter users.

In order to use the API, interested developers will be required to register on Twitter’s developer portal. At that point, they’ll be asked to provide detailed information on their plans for the API. Should their answers prove unsatisfactory (which is to say, if their plans do not meet Twitter’s terms of service), their requests will be rejected. Twitter has also noted that should developers send in applications with either insufficient or incomplete data, their app launch could be delayed as Twitter gathers further information.

Furthermore, developers may be required to undergo “additional, more rigorous policy reviews” if they change the user information that their app accesses, or if they request new features from the Twitter API. While these stringent new guidelines will initially apply only to new developers looking to create new apps, Twitter will eventually migrate all existing applications using the API to the new developer accounts. Affected parties will be given 90 days to move their apps.

Moreover, Twitter is also limiting the amount of content apps can post (though the allotment is still quite generous). Beginning September 10, these apps will “only” be able to post 300 tweets or retweets every three hours, give 1,000 likes every 24 hours, and send 15,000 direct messages every 24 hours. Like we said, still quite generous. If, for some reason, an app needs more than these limits, it will be given the option to request them.

And finally, Twitter will soon be rolling out a feature that allows users to report “bad apps,” which are those that violate Twitter’s terms of service, especially with regard to spam and privacy. Hopefully, these new guidelines and restrictions will result in a safer and more enjoyable Twitter experience for all.

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