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Twitter Circle is coming soon. Here’s what you need to know

Instead of just live tweeting their thoughts to everyone all at once, more Twitter users are now able to set some tweets to only be visible to specific people.

While Twitter announced that it began testing its Twitter Circle feature earlier this month, it appears that the social media platform has now expanded its test to more users. This past weekend, Android Police reported that the feature is now live for more users and shared a series of screenshots showing how Twitter Circle will appear. Twitter Circle is still not available for everyone, however, despite the expanded rollout.

Some Tweets are for everyone & others are just for people you’ve picked.

We’re now testing Twitter Circle, which lets you add up to 150 people who can see your Tweets when you want to share with a smaller crowd.

Some of you can create your own Twitter Circle beginning today! pic.twitter.com/nLaTG8qctp

— Twitter Safety (@TwitterSafety) May 3, 2022

Based on the screenshots Android Police shared, the Twitter Circle feature is accessible from the screen in which you would compose a tweet. Just above where you would type your tweet is a drop-down button menu in which you can choose your audience (in this case you can choose Twitter Circle). You can also add or remove the people in your Twitter Circle. Twitter does not notify other people if you remove them from or add them to your Circle.

But tweets that are only for Twitter Circle-approved people will be marked with a green note that says: “Only people in @[twitter account name’s] Twitter Circle can see this Tweet.”

If Twitter Circle has rolled out to you, you should be able to see it on the mobile app or on the web. In one of the screenshots, a test Twitter Circle tweet looks to have the retweet button grayed out, and so it appears that other users won’t be able to retweet these tweets.

The Verge also notes that “up to 150 users” can be added to a Circle “whether they follow you or not.”

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Anita George
Anita has been a technology reporter since 2013 and currently writes for the Computing section at Digital Trends. She began…
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