Dyllan Furness

Dyllan Furness

Dyllan Furness is a freelance writer from Florida. He covers strange science and emerging tech for Digital Trends, focusing on the people and ideas transforming the world. His other work has appeared at outlets like Vice, Ars Technica, and Quartz. If not online, you can find him in the kitchen, on the road, or on the dance floor.

Digital Trends Team

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Emerging Tech

China to launch the first mission to the far side of the moon

China plans to launch a spacecraft to the far side of the moon this month. The Chang’e-4 spacecraft is scheduled to take off on December 8 carrying a lander and rover, which will touch down on the lunar surface
Emerging Tech

Only three people have explored the deep oceans. Meet the next two

In a new mission called Five Deeps, a team of explorers will brave the inhospitable depths of the world’s oceans, observing, mapping, and collecting samples along the way. The explorers aim to traverse 40,000 nautical miles over the…
Emerging Tech

3D printing could help regrow bones of injured combat veterans

A scientist at the University of Arizona is investigating ways to mend broken bones using 3D printing and adult stem cells. The research is geared toward helping veterans who suffer combat injuries.
Emerging Tech

Scientists are beginning to worry about bacteria found in Space Station toilet

Scientists are beginning to worry about five new strains of microbes found in the toilet on the International Space Station. They are similar to recently discovered multi-drug resistant bacteria on Earth.
Emerging Tech

Time for test-tube turkey? Everything you need to know about lab-grown meat

Lab-grown meat is big business. A handful of enterprising startups have raised and invested hundreds of millions of dollars into nascent technology, banking on breakthroughs in biotech to revolutionize the food industry.
Emerging Tech

Hotter than the sun: Chinese fusion reactor claims breakthrough

China’s “artificial sun” has reached a temperature of 180 million ºF with a heating power of 10 megawatts -- six times hotter than the center of the sun. The achievement could mark progress towards fusion as a clean energy source.