Dyllan Furness

Dyllan Furness

Dyllan Furness is a freelance writer from Florida. He covers strange science and emerging tech for Digital Trends, focusing on the people and ideas transforming the world. His other work has appeared at outlets like Vice, Ars Technica, and Quartz. If not online, you can find him in the kitchen, on the road, or on the dance floor.

Digital Trends Team

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Emerging Tech

Are we living in a simulation? This MIT scientist says it’s more likely than not

The simulation hypothesis, which was famously probed in the 1999 film The Matrix, is the subject of a new book by Rizwan Virk, a computer scientist and video game developer who leads Play Labs at MIT. In his book, Virk endeavors to unpack…
Emerging Tech

Finalists from NASA’s 3D-printed Mars home challenge are out of this world

NASA selected three finalists in its 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge, an ongoing competition to design sustainable shelters suitable for the first colonists to live on the moon or Mars.
Emerging Tech

Brown thumb? Bloomengine takes the guesswork out of growing delicate plants

Bloomengine is a plant-growing chamber designed to take the guesswork out of growing delicate plants indoors. It features an LED light, automatic water, fan for ventilation, and even a camera to record progress.
Emerging Tech

Microbes survive outside the International Space Station, might do same on Mars

A new study shows that some microbes can inhabit the inhospitable environment of space outside the International Space Station. The study raises hope for the survival of microbes of Mars.
Emerging Tech

A.I. analyzes video to detect signs of cerebral palsy in infants

An A.I. algorithm capable of signaling early signs of neurodevelopment disorders in infants has been created by researchers in Finland and Italy. The research could help in early detection of disorders such as cerebral palsy.
Emerging Tech

NASA scientists want to send a cave-diving rover to the moon

Moon Diver would hitch a ride on a rocket in the mid-2020s and touch down a few hundred feet from one of the moon’s deep pits on the Sea of Tranquility basin. A smaller rover, Axel, would then rappel hundreds of feet into the large pits…