Web

Scottish government launches app to encourage women to drink less (but what about the guys?)

scottish government launches app to encourage women drink less but what about the guys wineIf you’re a bit of a boozer, are you more worried about your liver or your looks? The Scottish government has gone for the latter with the launch of a free app it hopes will encourage people to drink less.

The Drinking Mirror app – part of the government’s Drop a Glass Size sensible-drinking campaign, which kicked off Tuesday – claims to be able to simulate what the face of a heavy drinker will look like further down the road if they continue to guzzle the booze at their current rate.scottish government launches app to encourage women drink less but what about the guys drinking mirror

Once you’ve taken a photo of your face and answered some questions about your regular alcohol intake, Drinking Mirror will produce an image of your bloated, veiny, ruddy-cheeked future look. Apparently, this will be enough to scare you into asking for a smaller “Neat Cheat” glass of wine next time you’re on the razzle, as opposed to a super-large “Goldfish Bowl” glass.

The curious thing about the Drop a Glass Size campaign, however, is that it appears to be aimed only at women. There’s no mention of male drinking on the government’s web page announcing the initiative. What, don’t Scottish men drink?

According to figures from the government, almost 40 percent of women in Scotland regularly drink excessive amounts of alcohol, with the number of alcohol-related deaths among women aged between 30 and 44 doubling in the last two decades. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is also on the rise.

Launching the campaign, Scotland’s health secretary Alex Neil said, “Evidence shows us that most people who drink alcohol, particularly at home, have no idea of how much they are actually consuming. This campaign will show people how small changes to their drinking habits can have a significant impact on their health and well-being.”

Of course, men can also use the app to see how one too many drinks on a regular basis might affect their looks over time. It’s currently only available for Android devices, though an iOS version is on the way.

[Top image: Haver / Shutterstock]

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: A.I. selfie drones, ‘invisible’ wireless chargers

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Movies & TV

The best shows on Netflix, from 'The Haunting of Hill House’ to ‘The Good Place’

Looking for a new show to binge? Lucky for you, we've curated a list of the best shows on Netflix, whether you're a fan of outlandish anime, dramatic period pieces, or shows that leave you questioning what lies beyond.
Mobile

How to take great photos with the Pixel 3, the best camera phone around

You’ve scored yourself a new Google Pixel 3 or Pixel 3 XL, and you want to take advantage of that incredible camera. We’ve got everything you need to know right here about how to snap the best photos with your Pixel 3.
Wearables

Check out 25 of the best Wear OS apps for your smartwatch

Looking for some ways to spruce up that new Android smartwatch of yours? Here are the best Wear OS apps to download and use with any Android smartwatch, including a few specially enhanced for Wear OS 2.0.
News

Zoom in on famous works through the Art Institute of Chicago’s new website

Art lovers, listen up. The Art Institute of Chicago has given its website a serious makeover with new features that let you get up close and personal with more than 50,000 artworks by famous (and not so famous) artists.
Computing

Over a million veterans now eligible for Comcast’s Internet Essentials program

Comcast's low-cost Internet Essentials program, which provides internet access for just $10 per month, has expanded to include U.S. veterans. One million veterans now qualify for the service.
Computing

Google’s Squoosh will get an image web-ready with in-browser compression

Google's latest web app development is an image editing and compression tool, Squoosh. In just a few clicks, it can take a huge image and make it much lighter and web-friendly, all in your browser.
Computing

Want to save a webpage as a PDF? Just follow these steps

Need to quickly save and share a webpage? The best way is to learn how to save a webpage as a PDF file, as they're fully featured and can handle images and text with ease. Here's how.
Social Media

‘Superwoman’ YouTuber Lilly Singh taking a break for her mental health

Claiming to be "mentally, physically, emotionally, and spiritually exhausted," popular YouTuber Lilly Singh has told her millions of fans she's taking a break from making videos in order to recuperate.
Smart Home

Amazon has a huge team dedicated to enhancing Alexa and Echo

An Amazon executive on Tuesday, November 13 revealed the huge size of the team that's tasked with developing the Echo, the company's smart speaker, and Alexa, the digital assistant that powers it.
Music

Here's our head-to-head comparison of Pandora and Spotify

Which music streaming platform is best for you? We pit Spotify versus Pandora, two mighty streaming services with on-demand music and massive catalogs, comparing every facet of the two services to help you decide which is best.
Social Media

Going incognito: Here's how to appear offline on Facebook

How do you make sure your friends and family can't see if you're on Facebook, even if you are? Here, we'll show you how to turn off your active status on three different platforms, so you can browse Facebook without anyone knowing.
Computing

Our 10 favorite Chrome themes add some much-needed pizzazz to your boring browser

Sometimes you just want Chrome to show a little personality and ditch the grayscale for something a little more lively. Lucky for you, we've sorted through the Chrome Web Store to find best Chrome themes available.
Outdoors

Aussies hope free Wi-Fi on their beaches will lead to fewer drownings

Lifeguards in Australia have hit on an idea to use Wi-Fi to make the nation's beaches safer. It's a simple but clever idea that plays on our need to stay connected around the clock.