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Aston Martin wants to trademark the name 'Aeroblade,' but why?

Trademark filings attract a lot of attention these days, as they provide a hint at what a carmaker’s future plans might be. Companies can try to keep those plans under wraps, but thanks to the Internet, sometimes things just slip out.

That’s the case with Aston Martin’s application to trademark the name “Aeroblade.” While it definitely sounds cool, there’s little indication as to what that name might actually be used for. Aston may use it for a component rather than an entire car, theorizes AutoGuide. The name seems to indicate something related to aerodynamics, like an active rear spoiler.

That also makes sense given Aston Martin’s naming conventions. The carmaker traditionally gives models names beginning with “V,” such as Vanquish and Vantage, or “DB” followed by a number, such as DB9 and the upcoming DB11. Aston does make exceptions sometimes, as in the cases of the Rapide and Lagonda sedans and the Toyota iQ-based Cygnet, but it generally sticks to those patterns.

Related: 2016 Aston Martin DB9 GT first drive

It’s not that the firm doesn’t have any new models planned. The aforementioned DB11 will be unveiled sometime in 2016 as the replacement for the DB9. It will be the first clean-sheet Aston Martin design in years, riding on a new aluminum-intensive platform and benefiting from Aston’s new partnership with Daimler Benz. Like the DB9, the DB11 will spawn many variants, and its platform will probably be based on a replacement for the smaller Vantage.

Aston also just polished off a handful of Vantage-based DB10 coupes for the James Bond movie Spectre, most of which were destroyed during the course of filming. The DB10 wasn’t meant for sale, but some of its styling cues may find their way to future production models. The same goes for the recent Vulcan track car, which was limited to just 24 examples for well-heeled customers.

The RapidE concept unveiled back in October is also expected to morph into a production model. An electric version of the Rapide sedan, Aston claims it will produce up to 1,000 horsepower, and boast a range of at least 200 miles. The RapidE may donate powertrain components to an eventual production version of the DBX electric crossover concept as well.