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Volvo’s in-car delivery service brings a whole new meaning to ‘living in your car’

Volvo builds some of the safest cars around, but can they keep you safe from the crowds on Black Friday? The Swedish carmaker thinks they can, thanks to a new in-car delivery service it’s trying out in Gothenburg.

Customers participating in the program can have packages delivered to their cars, rather than their houses. The service is being offered in collaboration with communications and logistics company PostNord, as well as online retailers Lekmer.com and Mat.se.

Owners place orders online, and then a delivery person finds their car where’ve it happens to be. A digital key gives the delivery person one-time access to the vehicle so they can drop the package in the trunk. It helps cut down on the inconvenience of holiday shopping, whether online or in-store, Volvo says. It also seems to bring a whole new meaning to the phrase “living in your car.”

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The delivery service is only available to Volvo owners in Gothenburg who subscribe to the Volvo On Call telematics service. While it did not specifically discuss plans for the U.S., Volvo said it plans to offer in-car delivery in other parts of Sweden, and in other countries. It will also add more products by making deals with additional companies.

Volvo has been testing in-car delivery for some time, and could reportedly expand the concept to another vital service. A report earlier this year claimed the carmaker might try a fuel-delivery service. This would use similar technology to allow fuel-delivery trucks to find owners’ cars, unlock their fuel-filler caps, and top them off. That would save the trouble of pumping gas, but isn’t that what full service gas stations are for?

In-car delivery is another example of how carmakers are experimenting with ways to move beyond simply building and selling cars. Connected technologies are helping provide alternatives to car ownership, but they could also provide ways for car companies to make money off customers long after they drive away from the dealership.