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Read Microsoft’s lips: There will be no annual fee for Windows 10

There have been rumors all over the Web as of late, claiming that Microsoft will be charging fees to continue using Windows 10 after the free-for-one-year upgrade offer expires. Microsoft’s Gabriel Aul finally cleared the air on his Twitter account concerning this issue, according to Winbeta.org. The bottom line: There will be no annual fee for Windows 10.

A Twitter user had tweeted to Gabriel Aul, claiming that there needed to be more clarity surrounding what it means to receive a “free update for one year.” The individual, @OjJanne, said that the “statement leaves [the] door open for annual fees later.”

Related: Leaked Windows 10 build lets you try experimental features, or stop updates

Aul promptly replied to the tweeter, “Please allow me to close that door for you: No annual fee for Windows 10.” Afterward, he linked to a page on the official Windows site, detailing answers to some of the most frequently asked questions on the new OS.

If you go to the Windows 10 FAQ page, there is an answer posted for the question, “Is the upgrade really free?” Microsoft specifies that the operating system will be free, and it is not a trial or introductory version. However, it notes that there is a limited time period to take advantage of the upgrade – Windows 10 is available free for one year from the time it debuts.

Related: Users can perform a clean install of Windows 10 after the free upgrade

Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1 device users are eligible for the free upgrade. It will become available, starting with tablets and PCs, on July 29. On its FAQ page, Microsoft makes it a point to specify that the deadline for this upgrade is July 29, 2016.

The company states that it will take approximately one hour for Windows 10 to be fully installed, although it may be quicker on newer devices. You can reserve the download on your existing device by opening the “Get Windows 10” app before July 29.