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Watch this incredible video of the Rubik’s Cube world record being beaten

The world record for solving the famous 3×3 Rubik’s Cube puzzle now stands at an astonishing 5.25 seconds. Perhaps just as astonishingly, the previous record was a similarly unfeasible 5.55 seconds.

Achieved by teenager Collin Burns at a special event held at Central Bucks West High School in Pennsylvania, a video of the record-breaking attempt shows the dexterity, concentration, and skill needed for this achievement. It also contains a highly over-the-top reaction from someone off-camera, who screams like they’re being disemboweled following the result. It’s very loud, very long, and really annoying. Check your volume before playing the video.

Related: Google celebrated the Rubik’s Cube’s 40th anniversary with a special Doodle

Burns examines the Cube for a moment, after its jumbled up form is revealed from under a cover, before setting it down in readiness to solve the puzzle. Just over five seconds later, it’s done, and you can barely see his hands move during the process. If you’ve only managed to complete the Rubik’s Cube by taking it apart and putting it back together in the right order, then it’ll make you green with envy.

The competition was organized by the World Cube Association (yes, such a thing exists), which is responsible for managing events like this, and its official status means the world record will stand. While there are examples of even faster solves out there, they aren’t performed at a WCA-sanctioned competition. In a statement to Mashable, a WCA spokesman said Burns’ new world record should be entered into the database very soon, following confirmation all the rules had been followed.

If you’re a keen “cuber,” then there is plenty of analysis of Burns’ method and algorithm used over at the SpeedSolving.com website, where many are predicting someone will officially solve the puzzle in less than 4-seconds at an event soon. If you’re interested, you can also see the previous world record — which gets a far more restrained reception — in a video here.