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Shake your walls with Fluance's new flagship subwoofer, the DB12

Why it matters to you

If you're looking for room-shaking bass without paying a fortune, the DB12 seems worth a look.

Late in 2016, Fluance unveiled its DB10 subwoofer and promised at the same time that an even bigger and better model would follow in the spring. Now that model, the DB12 Powered Subwoofer — the company’s new flagship subwoofer — has arrived and it looks like it might have been worth the wait.

While the DB10 model was a rectangle shape, the DB12 is closer to a cube, measuring 16.7 x 15 x 16.8 inches. Like most subwoofers, this isn’t meant to stand out as a centerpiece in your room, but rather skulk next to your TV or behind your couch, and the different exterior options — black and two woodgrain varieties — makes it easier for the DB12 to blend in with its surroundings. The cabinet is constructed from MDF wood, lending warmth to the sound without added distortion.

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Like the DB10, this subwoofer uses a front-firing long throw driver, rather than the downward-facing drivers used in many subwoofers. As the number in the name hints, this model uses a 12-inch driver rather than the 10-inch driver used by the DB10. The driver uses a rigid cone design that the company helps to provide the maximum amount of bass possible while keeping distortion to a minimum.

The amplifier built into the DB12 packs 240 watts of RMS power, with peak power reaching up to 400 watts. The subwoofer features both line-level and high-level inputs, as well as the same for outputs. An auto function is built-in, keeping the subwoofer from using power when you’re not watching TV, and a phase correction switch to easily correct wiring mistakes.

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The Fluance DB12 Powered Subwoofer sells for $300 and is available from the company’s website, though if you’re thinking about a 5.2 or 7.2-channel setup, you are looking at spending $600 on a pair of them.