Home > Mobile > T-Mobile's new "One" plan, with no…

T-Mobile's new "One" plan, with no hidden fees, is rolling out now

Why it matters to you

Hidden fees are a drag, but T-Mobile's new One plan does away with any and all surprises -- the price you see is the price you pay.

T-Mobile is making yet another tweak to one of its mobile plans. At its “Un-carrier Next” event at CES 2017, the company announced a new and improved “One” plan, that would roll all fees — including taxes and monthly fees — into one, transparent rate. Well, that plan is now rolling out.

The One plan offers unlimited data, calls, and text messages, as well as other benefits like T-Mobile Tuesdays and data use in as many as 140 countries. As mentioned in a report from Neowin, the plan will not include offerings like Binge On, because with unlimited data there’s no need to have streaming services not count against your data use.

More: Should you upgrade to T-Mobile’s One or One Plus plans? We break it down

“Today, U.S. wireless customers have a choice — keep getting those confusing, fee-filled bills (like Verizon’s $110 plan that actually costs $210.70 on average for a family of four) or switch over to radical simplicity with T-Mobile One, now all unlimited and all in with monthly taxes and fees included,” the company said in a statement. “With T-Mobile One, the price advertised is the price you pay every month. No surprises.”

As of today, you’ll be able to get the plan both online and in retail stores, and it will cost $70 for one line, $120 for two lines, $140 for three lines, and $160 for four lines. If you don’t plan to use all that much data, T-Mobile also has a “KickBack” option, which essentially gives you $10 back each month that you don’t use more than 2GB of data. As the company notes in the fine print, you only qualify for KickBack if you make payments on time, and have good-standing credit.

The plan certainly is an interesting one, and hopefully other carriers will follow suit — unforeseen fees can be a real pain when signing up for service, and it’s nice to see at least one major carrier trying to do away with them.

See at T-Mobile