How to set up your VoIP service in 5 easy steps with RingCentral

Landline phone services are slowly but surely going the way of the dinosaur, with more individuals relying solely on their mobile devices for making calls. Businesses, however, have continued to rely on traditional landlines for professional use, but that’s also changing now thanks to internet-based VoIP services from providers like RingCentral, one of the most popular and highest-rated names in the business.

VoIP, or “voice over internet protocol,” simply uses the internet rather than landlines or cell networks to provide voice services. It makes perfect sense considering the internet is just a method for transmitting data quickly across large distances – after all, the internet originally used our telephone lines to do just that.

A good VoIP service like RingCentral is different than a landline phone in a few ways: First and foremost, VoIP is simpler and more affordable for small businesses to set up and manage than the complex and costly phone systems that larger companies typically use. Also, since it’s done over the internet and largely cloud-based, VoIP gives you more than just voice communication with additional features such as group chat, automatic recording, voicemail-to-text conversion, app-based network management, and video conferencing.

The process of choosing and setting up your VoIP service is surprisingly easy:

  1. Determine how many users you’ll have on your network. For a business, this will boil down to yourself and your employees. This important first step is the biggest factor in determining what sort of service package you’ll require.
  2. Assess your office’s internet speed. Your VoIP provider will do the heavy lifting when it comes to managing data in the cloud, but as this all works over the internet, you still need a connection capable of handling the load. You can test out your internet speeds to determine if they’re capable of supporting VoIP. If they can’t, consider upgrading your internet service.
  3. Decide what you actually need and are willing to pay for. VoIP is cheaper than a large enterprise-level landline setup, but there’s no need to get carried away by paying for a bunch of stuff you don’t need. Write down what features you know you need and will use (for instance, a good mobile app or video conferencing software), what features you’d like but aren’t absolutely necessary, and set a reasonable budget for all of it.
  4. Get your hardware. Once you’ve determined your needs, you’ll have a good idea of what equipment (namely phones) you require. You can buy dedicated VoIP phones, but modern providers like RingCentral also allow you to use their services right on the computers and mobile devices you already have. This can be set up for a new user in just a few minutes.
  5. Set it all up. Since RingCentral doesn’t require any complicated network equipment, all you need to do after signing up is download and install the software for your service package if necessary (this will be done on each device), follow the instructions, and you’re ready to go within minutes.

Learn More

RingCentral offers four service tiers for small businesses. These range from the basic “Essentials” package, which supports up to 10 users and is ideal for home offices, up to the “Ultimate” package, which supports unlimited users and includes a bundle of other advanced features like automatic call recording and voicemail-to-text, among others.

Prices for these tiers range from $20 to $50 per user per month if you pay annually (note that it’s $10 more if you decide to pay by the month). Once you’ve followed the steps above and figured out what you need, then you can check out all of RingCentral’s plans and pricing right to find the right VoIP solution for your business.

We strive to help our readers find the best deals on quality products and services, and choose what we cover carefully and independently. If you find a better price for a product listed here, or want to suggest one of your own, email us at dealsteam@digitaltrends.com.

Digital Trends may earn commission on products purchased through our links, which supports the work we do for our readers.
Deals

How to switch to VoIP and ditch your home phone bill for good

With cell phones exploding in popularity in recent years, a lot of folks have chosen to forgo the landline in favor of their mobile device. If you're operating a small business, however, a VoIP is an even better solution.
Computing

Want to make calls across the internet for less? Try these great VOIP services

Voice over IP services are getting more and more popular, but there are still a few that stand above the pack. In this guide, we'll give you a few options for the best VOIP services for home and business users.
Deals

Stay fit and save cash with our top 10 affordable Fitbit alternatives

As much as we love Fitbits, they're rather expensive. If all you want is a simple activity tracker, however, then check out these great cheap Fitbit alternatives. With offerings from brands like Garmin, you don't need to pay full price.
Deals

The best iRobot Roomba deals to make cleaning your home a breeze

Keep your home clean without lifting a finger using a robot vacuum cleaner. These nine iRobot Roomba deals not only help you keep your home tidy, but many also come with advanced features such as automatic scheduling and Wi-Fi connectivity.
Mobile

Google and Huawei offer to pay owners up to $400 for Nexus 6P bootloop fault

Anyone who suffered from the Nexus 6P's dreaded bootloop and can prove it may be in for a financial windfall. Google and Huawei have offered to pay up to $400 to those who purchased the Nexus 6P before a certain date.
Mobile

The FCC and White House want to bring high-speed internet to rural areas

The FCC and the White House unveiled new initiatives to bring high-speed internet to rural areas, including $20.4 billion in incentives to companies to build infrastructure. The FCC also announced ways to speed up the rollout of 5G.
Computing

Hackers broke into Outlook.com using worker’s credentials, Microsoft says

Microsoft's web-based email services were the target of a security beach. Using a customer support agent's credentials, hackers were possibly able to access email addresses and subject lines, but fortunately not their content.
Movies & TV

Disney Plus packs Star Wars, MCU, and The Simpsons too -- all for $7 per month

Disney is bringing the full weight of its massive content library to its own streaming service in 2019. How will Disney Plus compare to Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime? Here's what we know so far.
Business

Weekend box office: Shazam! stays on top while Hellboy flops

Warner Bros. Pictures superhero film Shazam! managed to stay on top of the box office its second week in theaters, beating new releases Little and Hellboy - the latter of which is looking like a major flop.
Business

Buying airline tickets too early is no longer a costly mistake, study suggests

When you book can play a big role in the cost of airline tickets -- so when is the best time to book flights? Earlier than you'd think, a new study suggests. Data from CheapAir.com suggests the window of time to buy at the best prices is…
Computing

Microsoft accelerates carbon reduction plans in new sustainability push

Microsoft wants to accelerate its sustainability goal of becoming a zero-carbon company. To reach those goals, Microsoft is doubling its self-imposed carbon tax to incentivize business divisions in making sustainable choices.
Mobile

Apple and Qualcomm settle all disputes, reach six-year agreement on chips

Apple and Qualcomm have announced that they have settled all disputes between them around the world -- and not only that, but have also agreed to a six-year agreement for Qualcomm to supply Apple with chips.
Mobile

The Department of Justice may prevent the T-Mobile-Sprint merger

T-Mobile and Sprint are getting closer to merging. After a few failed attempts, the two companies announced their merger at the start of 2018. The new T-Mobile could be better positioned to take on the likes of Verizon and AT&T.
Mobile

Intel gives up on 5G modems for smartphones, will focus on other devices

After a delay that saw Intel's manufacture of 5G modems pushed back to 2020, Intel has given up on the 5G modem business, and will focus its efforts elsewhere. But is something else to blame?