This brilliant Lego PC case isn’t a novelty, it’s a technical marvel

Building a custom gaming computer from scratch can be a daunting prospect for a novice, but the work experienced tinkerers can do is often very impressive. Now, one talented individual has constructed a project that demonstrates a complete mastery of both PC hardware and the world’s favourite building block.

Seeking a truly custom gaming PC, Mike Schropp decided to throw out the rulebook. The system’s case is the star here, standing at 19 inches tall and consisting of some 2,200 bricks. However, there’s far more wizardry lurking under the hood.

Schropp didn’t just build a Lego PC case for the sake of it; the brick-built exterior allows him to make all kinds of tweaks to improve the system’s cooling performance. In his blog post on the subject, he explains the unusual X-shaped form factor as an effort to “compartmentalize the components and give them their own fresh air inlets and exhausts.”

Every component in this build has been carefully considered. Its CPU is supported by Lego bricks, rather than hanging free, preventing any risk of damage due to the weight of other parts. Even the power supply was subject to modifications, with Schropp desoldering and switching out its stock capacitors in favor of Japanese-build replacements.

However, it’s clear that Schropp is as dedicated to the Lego portion of the build as he is to its electronic components. Purists will be pleased to hear that it uses advanced building techniques rather than glue, with everything from overlapping plates to Lego Technic components employed where necessary.

Between its sleek external appearance and the technical virtuosity accomplished inside — not to mention that it’s a gaming PC largely made out of Lego — this is one of the more remarkable builds you’re likely to see anywhere.

If you’re interested in commissioning your own brick-built rig, Schropp is taking orders. However, such mastery comes with a significant price tag; a system packing a Core i5 processor and a GTX 950 graphics card will run $1,600, with optional extras potentially adding a significant amount on to that figure.

Computing

An inside look at Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 8cx, a revolutionary laptop processor

Six years after Microsoft’s failed foray into ARM computing with Windows RT, its second effort with Always-Connected PC is now showing early signs of success. Microsoft partner Qualcomm told us how the Snapdragon 8cx might revolutionize…
Computing

Walmart denies that the Overpowered gaming PC has been canceled

Walmart's Overpowered PC desktop isn't going away, partner Esports Arena confirmed after the listing was briefly pulled. Walmart pulled the listing only to update the product page, and the gaming PC is again available to purchase.
Computing

In 2018, the rivalry between AMD and Intel has become more interesting than ever

When it comes to selecting a CPU for your PC, there's no shortage of chips for you to choose from. With Ryzen, Threadripper, and Core i9 CPUs though, the AMD vs. Intel argument is muddier than ever.
Computing

Changing file associations in Windows 10 is quick and easy with these steps

Learning how to change file associations can make editing certain file types much quicker than manually selecting your preferred application every time you open them. Just follow these short steps and you'll be on your way in no time.
Gaming

New ‘Battlefield V’ patch gives Nvidia’s ray tracing support a chance to shine

‘Battlefield V’ is the first game to use Nvidia’s ray tracing support, now available with the RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti graphics cards. The feature can, in an ideal scenario, make the game look better, but the performance hit may not be…
Computing

Intel's dedicated GPU is not far off -- here's what we know

Did you hear? Intel is working on a dedicated graphics card. It's called Arctic Sound and though we don't know a lot about it, we know that Intel has some ex-AMD Radeon graphics engineers developing it.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with six of the best PDF editors

There are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, and though the selection is robust, finding a solid solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here, we've rounded up best PDF editors, so you can edit no matter your budget or OS.
Computing

How to easily record your laptop screen with apps you already have

Learning how to record your computer screen shouldn't be a challenge. Lucky for you, our comprehensive guide lays out how to do so using a host of methods, including both free and premium utilities, in both MacOS and Windows 10.
Computing

From beautiful to downright weird, check out these great dual monitor wallpapers

Multitasking with two monitors doesn't necessarily mean you need to split your screens with two separate wallpapers. From beautiful to downright weird, here are our top sites for finding the best dual monitor wallpapers for you.
Computing

Capture screenshots with print screen and a few alternative methods

Capturing a screenshot of your desktop is easier than you might think, and it's the kind of thing you'll probably need to know. Here's how to perform the important function in just a few, easy steps.
Computing

These cheap laptops will make you wonder why anyone spends more

Looking for a budget notebook for school, work, or play? The best budget laptops, including our top pick -- the Asus ZenBook UX331UA -- will get the job done without digging too deeply into your pockets.
Mobile

Vanquish lag for good with the best routers for gaming

Finding the best routers for gaming is no easy task. With so many out there, how do you know which to pick? We've looked at the many options available and put together a list of our lag-free favorites.
Computing

Stop your PC's vow of silence with these tips on how to fix audio problems

Sound problems got you down? Don't worry, with a few tweaks and tricks we'll get your sound card functioning as it should, and you listening to your favorite tunes and in-game audio in no time.
Product Review

It's not the sharpest tool, but the Surface Go does it all for $400

Microsoft has launched the $400 Surface Go to take on both the iPad and Chromebooks, all without compromising its core focus on productivity. Does it work as both a tablet and a PC?