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This brilliant Lego PC case isn’t a novelty, it’s a technical marvel

Building a custom gaming computer from scratch can be a daunting prospect for a novice, but the work experienced tinkerers can do is often very impressive. Now, one talented individual has constructed a project that demonstrates a complete mastery of both PC hardware and the world’s favourite building block.

Seeking a truly custom gaming PC, Mike Schropp decided to throw out the rulebook. The system’s case is the star here, standing at 19 inches tall and consisting of some 2,200 bricks. However, there’s far more wizardry lurking under the hood.

Schropp didn’t just build a Lego PC case for the sake of it; the brick-built exterior allows him to make all kinds of tweaks to improve the system’s cooling performance. In his blog post on the subject, he explains the unusual X-shaped form factor as an effort to “compartmentalize the components and give them their own fresh air inlets and exhausts.”

Every component in this build has been carefully considered. Its CPU is supported by Lego bricks, rather than hanging free, preventing any risk of damage due to the weight of other parts. Even the power supply was subject to modifications, with Schropp desoldering and switching out its stock capacitors in favor of Japanese-build replacements.

However, it’s clear that Schropp is as dedicated to the Lego portion of the build as he is to its electronic components. Purists will be pleased to hear that it uses advanced building techniques rather than glue, with everything from overlapping plates to Lego Technic components employed where necessary.

Between its sleek external appearance and the technical virtuosity accomplished inside — not to mention that it’s a gaming PC largely made out of Lego — this is one of the more remarkable builds you’re likely to see anywhere.

If you’re interested in commissioning your own brick-built rig, Schropp is taking orders. However, such mastery comes with a significant price tag; a system packing a Core i5 processor and a GTX 950 graphics card will run $1,600, with optional extras potentially adding a significant amount on to that figure.

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Brad Jones
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Brad is an English-born writer currently splitting his time between Edinburgh and Pennsylvania. You can find him on Twitter…
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