Origami-inspired case depth checker takes the guesswork out of CPU cooler installation

Building your own PC can be a fun and rewarding process — but it’s not without its difficulties. When you’re using components from a host of different manufacturers, determining how all these parts come together inside your tower can be a real test. With that in mind, the PC peripherals specialists at Cryorig have released a tool to simplify one element of the process.

However, this particular tool isn’t as high-tech as you might expect. Once you’ve printed out its plans, get ready for an arts and crafts project inspired by the ancient Japanese tradition of paper folding.

The Cryorig Origami Case Depth Checker is an idiot-proof method of testing whether the CPU cooler tolerance height of your latest build is sufficient. All you need to do is print it out, fold it up, glue it together and run a piece of thread through it, and you can be sure that your build is in the clear.

The length of the Case Depth Checker is covered in labelled notches that refer to various heatsinks. You place the tool around the lid of your CPU, then slip your thread through the Checker to determine your case’s CPU cooler height tolerance.

The notches on the Checker allow you to figure out which heatsinks you can and cannot use in your build. Of course, the entirety of the Cryorig range is represented, but the manufacturer has also included other popular products from companies like Noctua and Coolermaster — and apparently the list will continue to be updated.

To get started with the Cryorig Origami Case Depth Checker, head to this page on the official Cryorig website. For more details head to the company’s blog post announcing the tool.

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