FBI uncovers string of large, unauthorized wire transfers to China

fbi warns of china related wire transfer fraud account takeover attack diagram

The FBI has issued a fraud alert about a trend of cyber-scams resulting in large unauthorized wire transfers to economic and trade companies located in the Heilongjiang province in China.

From March 2010 to April 2011, the FBI has identified 20 of these incidents aimed at small- to medium-sized U.S. businesses and public institutions that have accounts at small banks and credit unions. These cases have racked up a total of $11 million in losses, but the bureau says that the attempted fraud amount is close to $20 million.

The cyber criminal’s strategy is to focus on a computer within a company that has the capability to transfer funds in the company‘s name.  The computer is then tricked into giving up corporate online banking credentials, sometimes through a phishing email. When the user logs in to the online banking website, the Web session is redirected to a page saying the website is under maintenance. This is when the criminals make the unauthorized fund transfers.

Some of the cases have involved malware such as ZeuS, Backdoor.bot and Spybot to steal data and access the U.S. computers remotely.

The individual wire transfers are usually above $900,000 but have been as low as $50,000. The fraud perpetrators also send small domestic ACH and wire transfers to money mules in the United states. The transfers to the money mules range from $200 to $200,000 and happen within minutes of the large overseas transfers.

The Chinese economic and trade companies who received these wire transfers were located near the Russian border and appear to be legitimate business. Many of these companies have bank accounts with the Bank of China, the Agricultural Bank of China and the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China.

The Bureau’s press alert says that they don’t currently know who is behind the transfers or if the Chinese accounts were the final stop for the funds.

Photography

A turn for the better: Loupedeck+ adds custom dials, more to Lightroom console

The Loupedeck+ improves on the original Lightroom console by adding welcome customization options and introducing support for Skylum Aurora HDR. What's even better is that it does this all at an even lower price.
Smart Home

Fraudulent sales of home alarm systems are on the rise nationwide

According to a new consumer survey from the Consumer Federation of America, there are increasing reports of bad actors using scare tactics and manipulation to sell fraudulent alarm systems.
Computing

Australian student hacks into Apple, steals 90GB of data because he’s a ‘fan’

A 16-year-old student in Australia broke into Apple’s network multiple times for an entire year to download 90GB of “secure” data and access customer accounts. He did this because he was a "fan."
Emerging Tech

Don’t get burned! How to back crowdfunding projects the smart way

In the world of crowdfunding, there’s no such thing as a sure thing. There's a million reasons why a project might fail. But with this handy guide, you'll be able to spot the signs of a sketchy project and decrease your chances of getting…
Movies & TV

The best shows on Netflix in August, from ‘Arrested Development’ to ‘Dark Tourist’

Looking for a new show to binge? Lucky for you, we've curated a list of the best shows on Netflix, whether you're a fan of outlandish anime, dramatic period pieces, or shows that leave you questioning what lies beyond.
Mobile

Google One subscriptions offer more cloud storage for low prices, other perks

Can't get enough storage on Google Drive, Photos, or Gmail? Google One is the new way to boost your cloud storage. But it's not just about more space -- Google One comes with a loads of benefits.
Computing

Intel serves up ‘Bean Canyon’ NUCs revved with ‘Coffee Lake’ CPUs

Looking for a super-compact PC for streaming media that doesn’t break the bank? Intel updated its NUC family with its new “Bean Canyon” kits. Currently, there are five with a starting price of $300 packing eighth-generation Intel Core…
Deals

Save hundreds with the best MacBook deals for August 2018

If you’re in the market for a new Apple laptop, let us make your work a little easier: We hunted down the best up-to-date MacBook deals available online right now from various retailers.
Computing

Lost without 'Print Screen'? Here's how to take a screenshot on a Chromebook

Chrome OS has a number of built-in screenshot options, and can also be used with Chrome screenshot extensions for added flexibility. You have a lot of options, but learning how to take a screenshot on a Chromebook is easy.
Computing

Gaming on a laptop has never been better. These are your best options

Gaming desktops are powerful, but they tie you down to your desk. For those of us who prefer a more mobile experience, here are the best gaming laptops on the market, ranging from budget machines to maxed-out, wallet-emptying PCs.
Computing

A dead pixel doesn't mean a dead display. Here's how to repair it

Dead pixel got you down? We don't blame you. Check out our guide on how to fix a dead pixel and save yourself that costly screen replacement, or an unwanted trip to your local repair shop.
Computing

Asus claims ‘world’s thinnest’ title with its new Zephyrus S gaming laptop

The Republic of Gamers arm at Asus is claiming “world’s thinnest” with the introduction of its new Zephyrus S gaming laptop measuring just 0.58 inches at its thinnest point. The company also revealed the Strix SCAR II.
Computing

Intel teases new dedicated graphics card slated for 2020 release

Intel has confirmed plans to launch a dedicated graphics card in 2020. Although precious few details exist for the card at this time, it was silhouetted in a recent Intel video showcased at Siggraph 2018.
Computing

AMD Threadripper 2990WX hits 6GHz under liquid nitrogen overclock

AMD's Threadripper 2990WX was already powerful when it debuted with 32 cores and 64 threads, but one overclocker has used liquid nitrogen to push a single core up to 6GHz for a new world record.