New TSA security measure means your gadgets need their own private X-ray

tsa security measure requires electronics x rays airport check
Security in U.S. airports continues to get a great deal of attention, and electronic devices have been at the forefront of some recent security measures. Just a few months ago, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) required a number of airlines to prohibit carrying notebooks and other gadgets into the cabin, has since been rescinded. Now, the TSA has announced new security measures for many electronics.

The news comes via a TSA press release that outlines new policies and procedures regarding how electronics will be screened during the pre-flight check-in process. According to the new measures, all electronics larger than a cell phone must be placed in bins for X-ray scanning in the standard security lanes — similar to how laptops have been scanned for some time.

The measures were already being tested at 10 airports and the success of those initial pilots means that the TSA plans to expand the new measures to every U.S. airport. In addition, the TSA is working with airports and airlines to improve security measures at almost 280 airports in more than 100 countries.

If you traveled through any of the following airports recently, then you are already familiar with the new policy:

  • Boise Airport (BOI)
  • Colorado Springs Airport (COS)
  • Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW)
  • Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL)
  • Logan International Airport (BOS)
  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
  • Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport (LBB)
  • Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport (SJU)
  • McCarran International Airport (LAS)
  • Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport (PHX)

According to TSA Acting Administrator Huban A. Gowadia, “Whether you’re flying to, from, or within the United States, TSA is committed to raising the baseline for aviation security by strengthening the overall security of our commercial aviation network to keep flying as a safe option for everyone.”

The specific process outlined by the new policies mean that travelers will be required to remove electronics larger than cell phones from carry-on luggage and to place them in bins on the X-ray belt. To ensure a clear image, nothing can be placed on top of or underneath electronic devices. In addition, travelers may be subjected to additional bag checks.

Some of the devices that will be subject to the new measures include laptops, tablets, e-readers, and handheld game consoles. Otherwise, the usual restrictions on what can be brought through the checkpoints remain unchanged. Importantly, members of the TSA pre-check program are exempt from the new policies, and anyone looking to make their trip through airport security a little easier can always pick the right laptop bag to make accessing electronics a little easier.

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