This battery-free LED bike light uses magnets as a power source

Reelight’s bike lights have been keeping cyclists safe for more than 10 years, but the team behind them is now aiming to score Kickstarter backing for an upgraded design.

If you’ve not heard of Reelight‘s frictionless light system, here’s a quick overview. It comprises two parts: the light, which attaches to the front or rear left fork of your bike, and a magnet, which attaches to a spoke. As the wheel turns, the magnet powers the light, which flashes as you ride and stays lit for up to two minutes if you come to a standstill, such as at a stop light.

The “always on” bike light flashes night and day when you’re riding, a factor that Reelight says significantly ups its safety credentials. In addition, its battery-free design means you’ll never have to worry about it suddenly dying on a ride home in the dark.

The all-new Cio light

Reelight, an award-winning bike-light firm based in Denmark, is planning to launch its latest design, the Cio, via Kickstarter. The upgraded version has been improved to offer greater light intensity for other road users and pedestrians — it can be seen up to 300 meters away — and includes decent side visibility for everyone around you.

According to Reelight, it takes just a few seconds to attach the light to your bike using a new patent-pending mounting system.

As for the magnet, Reelight has redesigned it to make it more powerful, and while the system used to consist of two 12-centimeter (4.7 inches) modules, it’s now just one small, coin-sized magnet.

Worried about someone nabbing your light? Reelight says, “Since the lights are being mounted with a key, it’s very difficult for a thief to steal it. The wire is made out of coated stainless steel and is very hard to break.”

The eight-person team is looking for about $40,000 in funding to start shipping the Cio in October 2017. Early bird backers can pre-order a set (one white and one red) for about $40, which is around 38 percent off the expected retail price.

The new design “is just the kind of bike light that every avid biker was waiting for as it has no batteries, no friction, and can be easily mounted,” Reelight said. It certainly looks pretty appealing, and with the company’s lights already fixed to one out of every three bikes in Denmark’s main cities and 10 million sales made worldwide, this latest design could soon be lighting the way for many more cyclists before too long.

While you’re here, how about checking out Digital Trends’ pick of the coolest cycling gadgets on the market today.

Emerging Tech

How MIT hacked horticulture to cultivate a hyper-flavorful basil plant

At MIT, Caleb Harper used his personal food computers to alter the climate in which he grew basil. Exposing it light for 24 hours a day changed the flavor profile of the plant, making it spicier and stronger.
Computing

Gaming on a laptop has never been better. These are your best options

Gaming desktops are powerful, but they tie you down to your desk. For those of us who prefer a more mobile experience, here are the best gaming laptops on the market, ranging from budget machines to maxed-out, wallet-emptying PCs.
Mobile

The best LG G7 ThinQ cases will keep your phone looking new

The LG G7 ThinQ comes with a powerful processor, versatile cameras, and amazing sound. But a powerful phone still needs protection and you might want to change the style. Here are the best LG G7 ThinQ cases.
Computing

Microsoft reveals details of Surface Hub 2S, coming in June at $9,000

The Surface Hub 2 could be the most expensive whiteboard ever made, but it should be a powerful and capable one. With the ability to connect several of the 50-inch displays together, the picture at least, should be gorgeous.
Emerging Tech

How emotion-tracking A.I. will change computing as we know it

Affectiva is just one of the startups working to create emotion-tracking A.I. that can work out how you're feeling. Here's why this could change the face of computing as we know it.
Emerging Tech

Yale scientists restore cellular activity in a pig’s brain hours after its death

In what some may view as a porcine version of Frankenstein, Yale University scientists have restored circulation and cellular activity in a pig’s brain four hours after its death. The study is likely to be used to study brain function
Emerging Tech

NASA is building an inflatable space robot named King Louie

NASA is funding an inflatable robot called King Louie which could travel to the stars in deflated form and then be blown up when and where required. Here is why that's so exciting.
Emerging Tech

Russia’s robot news anchor gives human TV presenters hope

Human news anchors anxious about robots taking their jobs will be feeling reassured this week after the appearance on Russian TV of a news-reading android that clearly needs a bit of work.
Smart Home

I have seen the future, and it’s full of salad-making robots

Think that robots bussing tables, tossing salads and baking bread is a futuristic concept? It's actually not as far away as you might think. Robots took center stage at a food robotics summit in San Francisco this week, where they showed…
Emerging Tech

U.S. police are testing out Batman-style bola guns to catch criminals

U.S. police are taking a page out of Batman’s playbook with a new grappling hook gun, called the BolaWrap, which fires out a kevlar cord able to tie up assailants in the blink of an eye.
Emerging Tech

U.S., U.K. embrace autonomous robot spy subs that can stay at sea for months

Unmanned, autonomous robot spy submarines that are able to stay at sea for months at a time may be coming to both the United States and its ally across the pond, the U.K. Here's what we know so far.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Facebook data security, Ubisoft helps Notre Dame, and more

Join DT Live as we discuss Facebook security issues, Ubisoft's plan to help rebuild Notre Dame, and more. We are also joined by Emily Teteut of Snap the Gap, Jennifer Sendrow of New York Public Radio, and DJ and producer Zeke Thomas.
Emerging Tech

Meet the gene-edited bacteria that could make cannabis plants obsolete

Ever wanted to brew cannabis like you brew craft beer? At UC Berkeley, biologists have managed to engineer brewer’s yeast so that it produces the main cannabinoids found in marijuana.
Emerging Tech

Planet-hunting satellite discovers its first Earth-sized planet

NASA's planet hunting satellite, TESS, has made a new discovery. Last month the satellite discovered its first exoplanet. And now it has achieved another milestone, locating its first Earth-sized planet and a larger sibling planet.