Cooler Cannon is the beer-tossing icebox you’ve been waiting for

If the effort of walking over to the cooler to grab a beer is just too much for you to handle, then this can-tossing cooler is a contraption you’ll definitely want to have at your next party.

The Cooler Cannon looks like a regular cooler save for the hole in the top. It’s from there that the beer flies forth, allowing you to maintain your sitting or standing position as the beer sails through the air toward your waiting hand. Perfect.

Designed by Indiana-based Derek Hoy, the Cooler Cannon made its debut on Kickstarter in 2013, but while 84 expectant partygoers enthusiastically stumped up a total of $17,358 during the campaign, the sum fell well short of its $275,000 goal.

Older, presumably wiser, and possibly having consumed a good many beers flung from the cooler in the intervening years, Hoy is back with a refined design that replaces the Cooler Cannon’s remote controller with a smartphone app, enabling partygoers to summon a beer with a single tap. So now everyone at the party can join in.

Yes, the Cooler Cannon is once again going for glory, aiming to persuade canned-drink consumers (no, it doesn’t have to be beer) that it’s worth every cent of however much it finally goes on sale for, which, according to its website, could be for as little as $195.

The cooler holds up to 18 cans and can throw each one as far as eight feet. Just make sure you know which way it’s going to go before you hit the launch button, or someone could get a nasty surprise. Importantly, it takes just two seconds to reload each can into the firing mechanism, meaning no one will have to wait too long for their beverage (until you have to fill it up again 36 seconds later.)

Like any hefty cooler worth its salt, the Cooler Cannon also features a couple of wheels and a handle, so you can easily take it to your party spot from your car, and back again.

If you’re still of the opinion that the Cooler Cannon isn’t really that cool, then check out DT’s pick of the best alternatives. It’s never too early to start prepping your next summer party, is it?

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