Nike’s power-lacing shoes hit stores today, but good luck finding a pair

nike hyperadapt go on sale sneakers boxed
Nike
If you hate tying laces, and slip-on shoes just aren’t exciting enough for your multifarious foot-based exploits, then how about a pair of “power-lacing” sneakers for your feet?

They’ve been a long time coming, but Nike’s much-anticipated HyperAdapt 1.0 footwear – inspired by the snazzy self-lacing MAG shoes worn by Marty McFly in Back to the Future II – are finally hitting stores today. Well, two stores, to be precise. Both in New York City.

Costing a cool $720 a pop, the specially designed footwear features automatic “adaptive fit” technology powered by a so-called “lacing engine” located at the base of the shoe. As you slip your foot inside, it triggers a sensor in the heel that causes the shoe to gently tighten. Two buttons on the outside of the sneaker allow for smaller adjustments to give you the absolute snuggest of fits.

hyperadapt-1-0
Nike
Nike

Nike released an image of the packaging on Thursday. It shows not only the main attraction, but also a Quick Start guide, charging pucks that magnetically attach to the bottom of each sneaker, and an AC adapter. The sportswear giant says that with average use the incorporated battery should keep the tech functioning for up to two weeks on a single charge. The shoe’s built-in lights glow three different colors to let you know the state of the battery. A full charge takes about three hours.

The HyperAdapt shoe was co-designed by Tinker Hatfield and Tiffany Beers. Speaking earlier this year, Hatfield said he believes adaptive lacing could be a hit with athletes as the system provides a “tailored-to-the-moment” custom fit.

“It’s amazing to consider a shoe that senses what the body needs in real-time,” Hatfield said, adding that the unique design “eliminates a multitude of distractions, including mental attrition, and thus truly benefits performance.”

So where exactly can you grab a pair of these flashy, high-tech sneakers? Why, at Nike stores, of course. Both are in Manhattan – Nike Soho on the corner of Broadway and Spring Street, and the Nike+ ClubHouse at 45 Grand – which means most of the world’s sneaker fans won’t have the chance to slip their feet inside a pair. However, Nike does say on its website that the new shoes will be landing in additional select stores later this month. Presumably outside of Manhattan.

Mobile

The Cat S48c is the phone designed for construction workers (or the clumsy)

The Cat S48c is a rugged smartphone that's available from Sprint. It mixes midrange specs with a huge battery wrapped in an extremely tough and protective body. If you need a phone that can survive the construction site, then this is it.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: camera with A.I. director, robot arm assistant

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Outdoors

Nike’s Adapt BB shoes let you tighten your laces with an iPhone

The new Nike Adapt BB shoe comes with smartphone connectivity that allows the user to tighten the laces using a smartphone while providing the ability to adjust tension throughout the game.
Smart Home

Haier’s shoe washer cleans sneakers without all the clanging and banging

At CES 2019, Haier brought a bunch of shoe-centric appliances, including its sneaker washer. The appliance douses shoes with water and detergent and scrubs them, and then you can put them in the accompanying dryer.
Emerging Tech

Meet Wiliot, a battery-less Bluetooth chip that pulls power from thin air

A tiny chip from a semiconductor company called Wiliot could harvest energy out of thin air, the company claims. No battery needed. The paper-thin device pulls power from ambient radio frequencies like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and cell signals.
Emerging Tech

Hexbot is a modular robot arm that does everything from drawing to playing chess

Who wouldn’t want their own personal robot arm to do everything from laser engraving to competing against you in a game of chess? That's what Hexbot, a new modular robot, promises to deliver.
Emerging Tech

Google’s radar-sensing tech could make any object smart

Computer scientists have shown how Google’s Soli sensor can be used to make dumb objects smart. Here's why radar-powered computing could finally make the dream of smart homes a reality.
Emerging Tech

The best drone photos from around the world will take your breath away

Most of today's drones come equipped with high-end cameras, which are quickly revolutionizing the world of aerial photography as we know it. Here are some of the best drone photos from around the world.
Emerging Tech

Too buzzed to drive? Don’t worry — this autonomous car-bar will drive to you

It might just be the best or worst idea that we've ever heard: A self-driving robot bartender you can summon with an app, which promises to mix you the perfect drink wherever you happen to be.
Emerging Tech

Scientists successfully grow human blood vessels in a Petri dish

Researchers have managed to grow human blood vessels in a Petri dish for the first time, and even to successfully implant them into live mice. The results could be a game-changer for diabetes.
Emerging Tech

Tiny animals discovered in Antarctic lake deep beneath the ice

Scientists have made a surprising discovery in Antarctica: the carcasses of tiny animals including crustaceans and a tardigrade were found in a lake that sits deep beneath over half a mile of Antarctic ice.
Emerging Tech

How long is a day on Saturn? Scientists finally have an answer

The length of Saturn's day has always been a challenge to calculate because of the planet's non-solid surface and magnetic field. But now scientists have tracked vibrations in the rings to pin down a final answer.
Emerging Tech

Tiny microbots fold like origami to travel through the human body

Tiny robots modeled after bacteria could be used to deliver drugs to hard to reach areas of the human body. Scientists have developed elastic microbots that can change their shape depending on their environment.
Emerging Tech

Dinosaurs never stood a chance after asteroid impacts doubled 290M years ago

The number of asteroids pummeling Earth jumped dramatically around 290 million years ago. By looking at Moon craters, scientists discovered that d the number of asteroid impacts on both Earth and the Moon increased by two to three times.