Kickstarter roller coaster construction kit works in conjunction with your Legos

Ever wanted to build a roller coaster in your home, but lacked the millions of dollars, hundreds of acres of land and supportive partner you would invariably need to achieve your dream? If so, you may be interested in a new Kickstarter project, which promises to bring coaster fans the most realistic, physics-accurate miniature roller coaster kit yet, compatible with regular Lego blocks.

The creation is the work of Jack Rimer and Michael Graham, who together make up the company CoasterDynamix. In their regular working lives, Rimer, Graham and engineer Dan Linden create mini roller coasters as prototypes for theme parks wanting to show off their latest attraction.

This necessitates making model coasters which act like their larger life-size counterparts. That same philosophy was at the forefront of their minds when they came to build their current Cyclone Kickstarter kit.

“We wanted to create a model that closely mimicked the coefficients of friction and the capabilities of a real roller coaster,” Rimer told Digital Trends. “We were after a system that would allow us to have hills and inversions that act like real coasters in terms of efficiency. A combination of self-lubricating plastic and metal wheels have given us a train that’s capable of doing all the things that a real rollercoaster is capable of.”

They should know: Graham is a real coaster engineer.

The Cyclone kit comes with more than 1,000 individual pieces, including both standard and custom bricks, lift chain, gears, hand crank, track, and a train. Put these together — which you do in any formation you can dream up — and you have everything you need to build a four-foot long working roller coaster model. Because it is compatible with Lego bricks, you can even theme it using existing Lego sets, which means a pirate or sci-fi coaster can be easily achieved.

As Rimer pointed out, however, it is when you put multiple Cyclone kits together that things get really exciting. “We did that and put together an eight-foot long coaster,” he said. “Based on our pledges so far, that seems to be what most people plan on doing, as well.”

In all, it is an exciting project — and worth checking out if the idea appeals to you. A Cyclone kit pledge on Kickstarter will set you back $149, but multiples come with some sizeable discounts.

After that, it is just a matter of building. Best thing of all? No queues.

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Halfbikes, VR for all your senses, and more

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it's fun to gawk!
Movies & TV

The best movies on Netflix in March, from Buster Scruggs to Roma

Save yourself from hours wasted scrolling through Netflix's massive library by checking out our picks for the streamer's best movies available right now, whether you're into explosive action, witty humor, or anything else.
Gaming

The best of the last generation: Our 50 favorite Xbox 360 games

The Xbox 360 thrived during a generation where games were plentiful. Here's our list of the best Xbox 360 games of all time, including all game genres and even a few special indie hits.
Emerging Tech

Feast your eyes on the wildest, most elaborate Rube Goldberg machines ever built

Want to see something totally mesmerizing? Check out several of the best Rube Goldberg machines from across the internet, including one that serves cake and others that do ... nothing particularly useful.
Emerging Tech

Adidas has created a running shoe that’s made to be remade

Adidas has unveiled the Futurecraft Loop running shoe that it claims is the first performance footwear to be 100% recyclable. The shoe is the latest green initiative by the sportswear company and will go on sale in 2021.
Emerging Tech

How emotion-tracking A.I. will change computing as we know it

Affectiva is just one of the startups working to create emotion-tracking A.I. that can work out how you're feeling. Here's why this could change the face of computing as we know it.
Emerging Tech

NASA is building an inflatable space robot named King Louie

NASA is funding an inflatable robot called King Louie which could travel to the stars in deflated form and then be blown up when and where required. Here is why that's so exciting.
Emerging Tech

Yale scientists restore cellular activity in a pig’s brain hours after its death

In what some may view as a porcine version of Frankenstein, Yale University scientists have restored circulation and cellular activity in a pig’s brain four hours after its death. The study is likely to be used to study brain function
Emerging Tech

Russia’s robot news anchor gives human TV presenters hope

Human news anchors anxious about robots taking their jobs will be feeling reassured this week after the appearance on Russian TV of a news-reading android that clearly needs a bit of work.
Smart Home

I have seen the future, and it’s full of salad-making robots

Think that robots bussing tables, tossing salads and baking bread is a futuristic concept? It's actually not as far away as you might think. Robots took center stage at a food robotics summit in San Francisco this week, where they showed…
Emerging Tech

U.S. police are testing out Batman-style bola guns to catch criminals

U.S. police are taking a page out of Batman’s playbook with a new grappling hook gun, called the BolaWrap, which fires out a kevlar cord able to tie up assailants in the blink of an eye.
Emerging Tech

U.S., U.K. embrace autonomous robot spy subs that can stay at sea for months

Unmanned, autonomous robot spy submarines that are able to stay at sea for months at a time may be coming to both the United States and its ally across the pond, the U.K. Here's what we know so far.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Facebook data security, Ubisoft helps Notre Dame, and more

Join DT Live as we discuss Facebook security issues, Ubisoft's plan to help rebuild Notre Dame, and more. We are also joined by Emily Teteut of Snap the Gap, Jennifer Sendrow of New York Public Radio, and DJ and producer Zeke Thomas.
Emerging Tech

Meet the gene-edited bacteria that could make cannabis plants obsolete

Ever wanted to brew cannabis like you brew craft beer? At UC Berkeley, biologists have managed to engineer brewer’s yeast so that it produces the main cannabinoids found in marijuana.