These insane 50 mph electric mountain bikes can handle any type of terrain

We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: humanity is living in the golden age of rideable technology right now. In the past few years, electric motors have become smaller and more powerful, and batteries have become more capacitous and long-lasting — two trends that have coalesced and kicked off a renaissance in personal mobility devices.

There’s almost too many of them to keep track of anymore. Between all the electric skateboards, gyroscopically stabilized unicycles, and motorized skates; staying on top of all the new rideable gizmos that get announced each month is damn near impossible. Case in point: These ridiculously badass electric mountain bikes from Australian upstart Stealth Electric. Somehow, despite the fact that they’ve been on the market for a couple years now, we hadn’t heard of them until recently.

And that’s a shame. Based on the videos and specs listed on the company’s website, Stealth Electric’s bikes look absolutely insane. With a lightweight design, built-in shock absorbers, 5,200 watts of peak power, and a top speed of 50 miles per hour; the bikes effectively blur the line between mountain bike and electric motorcycle.

Currently, the company offers three different models, each tuned for a different style of riding. There’s the B-52 Bomber, the company’s flagship ride; the F-37 Fighter, which is lighter and more agile; and the H-52 Hurricane, which is designed to ride more like a dirtbike. Take your pick — they all look ridiculously fun.

But of course, these beasts don’t come cheap. Base models start at around $8,000, and can go up as high as $10,000 if you opt for all the high-performance add-ons that are available. That’s pretty steep, but don’t worry if you can’t afford one — we fully intend to do a hands-on review of at least one of these bikes in the near future, so stay tuned for the review and you’ll be able to live vicariously through us. In the meantime, we highly recommend checking out this Network A video of FMX rider Ronnie Renner shredding one around the trails near his house.

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