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Modder adds 'Super Mario Odyssey' mechanics to 'Super Mario 64'

Super Mario Odyssey 64 V2 release trailer - control enemies with your hat!
Video games are constantly evolving and thanks to the efforts of modders, that is true for classic releases, too. At E3 2017, Nintendo unleashed a wealth of information about Super Mario Odyssey and how a new character called Cappy will change Mario’s typical gameplay. Already, a talented modder has implemented some of these mechanics in Super Mario 64.

As you may have guessed from the name, Cappy is a sentient cap. Its abilities are rather less obvious, as throwing the cap at a character or an object allows Mario to take full control of the target, a brand new gameplay mechanic for the franchise.

However, a modder called Kaze Emanuar introduced this skill to Super Mario 64, publishing a video on YouTube just a day after the new Super Mario Odyssey trailer debuted. Given the timeframe and the task at hand, it is an impressive piece of work.

Just like in Odyssey, Mario can fling his cap at a Bob-omb and take over its motor functions, according to Nintendo Life. The cap can also be used as a platform, giving the plumber a handy bit of wiggle room during intense platforming scenarios.

Of course, Super Mario 64 was not designed with this cap-flinging mechanic in mind, but that does not mean that Emanuar’s mod does not have any practical applications. The video shows how players can use the ability to take out certain enemies with ease and even reach the top of the castle without having to collect every star in the game.

While there are some rough edges to the way Cappy has been added into Super Mario 64, the skill required to complete such a project in a matter of time is undeniable. This mod is not exactly Super Mario Odyssey, but it might just hold fans over until the game comes out on October 27.

Brad Jones
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Brad is an English-born writer currently splitting his time between Edinburgh and Pennsylvania. You can find him on Twitter…
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