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Keymander Nexus is a handy KVM switch for all your gaming devices

Iogear unveiled a new line of gaming products at CES 2022, including its Keymander Nexus Gaming KVM. The device allows players to connect consoles and PCs to one box so they can share a monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

Scheduled to release sometime this spring, the Keymander Nexus is compatible with all current consoles, including the PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X/S, and Nintendo Switch. When a monitor and controls are plugged in, players can quickly toggle between devices with the press of a button. Theoretically, this would give players an easy way to use mouse and keyboard on console games without plugging and unplugging accessories when switching systems.

The Keymander Nexus gaming VKM switch sits on a white background.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

The device supports 4K gaming at 60Hz via HDMI 2.1, so it can’t take full advantage of the current PlayStation and Xbox consoles. It has limited support for PS5, as the device won’t work with a DualSense controller at the moment. It can use Switch, PS4, and Xbox controllers, though.

The Keymander Nexus has a few more tricks up its sleeve. It has built-in DAC that reportedly enhances game audio, and it connects to an app that can be used to adjust key mapping, mouse sensitivity, and more.

The device will retail for $200 and Iogear is hoping to have it out by June.

This is just one many gaming products Iogear brought to this year’s show. The company showed off a compact 65% Mechlite Nano keyboard, a full-sized Hver Stealth model, and the Unikomm, a full-featured gaming headset that’ll retail for only $30 when it launches sometime this year.

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Giovanni Colantonio
Giovanni is a writer and video producer focusing on happenings in the video game industry. He has contributed stories to…
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