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Netflix games may be coming to TVs soon, as revealed by new iOS app

A Netflix controller app shows gamepad buttons on screen.
Netflix

It looks like Netflix might be expanding its gaming offerings to TVs soon, as a Netflix Game Controller is now on the iOS App Store. Netflix has yet to announce or comment on the purpose of the app, but a message shown when the app boots up confirms that it’s coming.

Netflix has slowly made its way into the gaming industry over the past couple of years, acquiring studios and adding a dedicated game section to its mobile app that lets players download premium mobile games. The library includes some great games like Poinpy and Before Your Eyes, but has yet to break into the mainstream, likely due to its somewhat obscure availability. This new app, which was preemptively listed on Apple’s storefront by Netflix and lines up with leaks from earlier this year, indicates that Netflix Games are coming to the TV. The message that appears when booting up the Netflix Game Controller app.

The description for the app states that “this Game Controller app pairs with your TV and allows you to play games on Netflix using your phone or mobile device.” After downloading and booting up the app, Digital Trends discovered two more messages asking players to “choose a game on your TV and follow the directions to connect” and that “Netflix Games on TV are in beta. Some devices may not be supported at this time.”

All of this points to an impending beta rollout for games on Netflix’s TV apps, which has not been announced yet. As such, we don’t have any idea about which televisions or games the iOS app or Netflix Games on TV will support just yet. Regardless, this looks like a massive evolution for Netflix’s gaming efforts, especially as it gears up to release a cloud gaming service.

Netflix declined to comment on the program when asked by Digital Trends, but it did refer us to previous statements it made about its intentions to break into cloud and TV game streaming.

Tomas Franzese
Tomas Franzese is a Staff Writer at Digital Trends, where he reports on and reviews the latest releases and exciting…
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