Man arrested for charging his iPhone in a London train

man arrested for charging his iphone in a london train overground
pisaphotography / Shutterstock
Just because there is an available wall outlet doesn’t automatically make it okay to charge your phone there. And 45-year-old Camden resident Robin Lee found that out the hard way when he was arrested for doing so, reports Wired UK.

According to the report, Lee entered a train on the London Overground, a surburban rail network in the United Kingdom, when he decided to use a wall outlet to charge his iPhone. Apparently unbeknownst to Lee, there were signs near these outlets that indicated they were not for public use and could only be used by cleaners. As a result, he was promptly arrested for “abstracting electricity,” or using electricity without paying for it.

Interestingly enough, Lee was “de-arrested” for the offense, but was then placed in handcuffs yet again for “unacceptable behaviour” after he reportedly became aggressive towards a police community support officer (PCSO). Talking to the Evening Standard, a British Transport Police (BTP) spokesperson said officers were called to the train station after a man became aggressive “when challenged by a PCSO about his use of a plug socket onboard an Overground train.”

The story gets stranger still. Lee decided to post an image of his custody record on Twitter in order to get several London-based news organizations on his side. Since then, however, he deleted any related posts on the matter, including his custody record.

The events that transpired will be reviewed before details are passed along to the Crown Prosecution Service, which will determine whether any charges will be brought against Lee.

Funny enough, this isn’t the first time someone has gotten into hot water over using a wall outlet they weren’t supposed to use. In New York City, 19-year-old Nick Silvestri climbed up on stage with his iPhone during a performance of Hand to God in order to charge his iPhone. For some reason, he didn’t realize that the stage was off-limits to the audience, especially during a performance. He has since issued a public apology for the incident, though his lack of common sense might be the real foil.

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