New SteelSeries mechanical keyboards are the first to have adjustable actuation

SteelSeries today announced the first ever mechanical keyboard with fully adjustable actuation switches; the Apex Pro and Apex Pro TKL. The new gaming keyboards can automatically change key sensitivity depending on the app in use — switching from typing documents to playing a first-person shooter.

The all new Apex Pro and Apex Pro Ten Keyless (TKL) mechanical keyboards are outfitted with SteelSeries patented OmniPoint Switches. These unique switches have magnetic sensors that allow users to choose the sensitivity of their keys. The keys can be adjusted between longer actuation point of 3.6mm for accuracy all the way to 0.4mm for faster speed.

This makes the Apex Pro a very versatile keyboard for a number of different use cases, from typing to gaming. The SteelSeries Engine can automatically switch the actuation depending on the app running. The magnetic sensors are also significantly faster in response time than traditional mechanical switches, which SteelSeries claims makes the Apex Pro the fastest and most responsive keyboard.

In addition to the new switches, the Apex Pro has an integrated OLED Smart Display. The display shows instant notifications from apps like Discord, Spotify, and some games like CS: Go and Dota 2. However, it also allows players to switch their actuation point directly from the keyboard.

The Apex Pro is made with sturdy, aircraft-grade aluminum for lifetime durability and has per-key RGB lighting that can be synced with other SteelSeries peripherals. Player settings can be saved in one of the five on-board profiles. USB pass-through is also included, as well as three-way cable routing under the frame and a premium magnetic wrist rest.

The Apex Pro and Apex Pro TKL will retail for $200 and $180 respectively at Best Buy and SteelSeries.com. Availability varies with Apex Pro starting in the U.S. from June 11 and with the Apex Pro TKL joining it in Europe and Asia later this fall.

Apex 7 and Apex 7 TKL

SteelSeries also announced the Apex 7 and Apex 7 TKL. These keyboards are physically identical to the Apex Pro but trade the OmniPoint switches for traditional Red, Blue or Brown mechanical switches.

The Apex 7 and Apex 7 TKL will retail for $160 and $130 respectively. The Red switch versions will be available first in U.S. Europe and Asia starting in June. The Blue and Brown switch versions will follow later this fall.

Emerging Tech

NASA selects landing site candidates for OSIRIS-Rex to sample asteroid Bennu

Last year, the OSIRIS-REx craft arrived at asteroid Bennu, from which it will collect a sample from the asteroid to be brought back to Earth. Now, the NASA team has selected four potential sites to choose from for the sampling mission.
Gaming

These are the must-have games that every Xbox One owner needs

More than four years into its life span, Microsoft's latest console is finally coming into its own. From Cuphead to Halo 5, the best Xbox One games offer something for players of every type.
Mobile

Here are the best iPad Pro keyboard cases to complement your favorite tablet

The iPad Pro can double as a laptop, but it needs a proper keyboard to achieve that task. There are loads of keyboard/case combos to choose from; we rounded up the best of the lot right here.
Computing

It's Windows vs MacOS in a head to head of two great, lightweight laptops

The MacBook Air was updated with more contemporary components and a more modern design, but is that enough to compete with standouts like Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 detachable tablet?
Computing

If you can only buy one, should it be the MacBook Pro or the iPad Pro?

If you need a powerful, portable device that can handle any task you throw at it, both the MacBook Pro and iPad Pro fit the bill. But which one is best? We run down the pros and cons of each device to help you decide which one you should…
Emerging Tech

NASA wants to send two more missions to Mars to collect rock samples

With its Mars 2020 mission, NASA hopes to collect samples from the surface of the planet. The challenge is how to get those samples back to Earth. Now, NASA has revealed its plans for two followup missions to Mars.
Gaming

Epic Games insists Fortnite B.R.U.T.E. is fun; #RemoveTheMech not happening

Epic Games said that the controversial B.R.U.T.E. vehicles are part of providing "a fun experience" to Fortnite players. It appears that the developer has no plans of listening to the #RemoveTheMech movement.
Computing

Microsoft Surface Pro 6, Surface Book 2 throttled to 400 MHz by safety feature

The Microsoft Surface Pro 6 and Surface Book 2 are suffering from throttling issues that are slowing them down to 400 MHz. The problem is apparently related to an Intel CPU flag that is designed to keep systems from overheating.
Gaming

Microsoft’s Xbox head debunks rumors of streaming-only console in the works

Xbox head Phil Spencer debunked rumors that Microsoft is working on a streaming-only console that will utilize the company's Project xCloud. Spencer also said cloud gaming will not soon replace traditional consoles.
Emerging Tech

The black hole at the center of our galaxy is flaring and no one knows why

At the heart of our galaxy lies a supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. Normally this giant monster is relatively docile, but recently it's been a hotbed of unexpected activity, rapidly glowing 75 times brighter than normal.
Emerging Tech

SpaceIL’s crashed lander may have sent thousands of tardigrades to the moon

When the SpaceIL craft Beresheet crashed into the moon earlier this year, it left more than just an impact mark. Thousands of micro-animals called tardigrades were along for the ride and may have survived the crash.
Gaming

Sorry, you can’t exchange your Nintendo Switch for an upgraded model

Customer representatives said that those who purchased the old model of the Nintendo Switch after July 17 would be able to upgrade their console into the new model for free. A Nintendo spokesperson has now denied the exchange program.
Emerging Tech

NASA’s satellite projects will study the sun using solar sailing

Small satellites can be used for all sorts of purposes, and NASA has been searching for ideas to push ahead the capabilities of the hardware. The agency has announced two new projects to demonstrate the potential of small satellites.
Emerging Tech

Hubble captures a beautiful cosmic jellyfish made of glowing gas

A new image from Hubble might look like a deep-space jellyfish, but it's not a sign of extraterrestrial life - in fact, it's a planetary nebula called NGC 2022, located in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter).