Man caught driving 112 mph blames it on Snapchat’s new speed filter

snapchat seven billion video views women selfies user customers consumers marketing
A man has been arrested after driving at almost twice the speed limit on a highway in Georgia. Nothing that unusual, except the driver didn’t give any of the usual, tired excuses cops may often hear in these situations. No, the driver admitted he was speeding because he wanted to capture it on Snapchat.

Clocked at 112 miles per hour, Malon Neal told astounded officers he was doing it for Snapchat after he was pulled over. Footage recorded at the time shows Neal’s honesty when the cops confront him over the speeding. Although he doesn’t go into much detail, there’s an excellent chance he was using the Snapchat filter which can measure current speed, and placed it over the top of a picture.

“I would love to see where you are headed in such a hurry,” the officer asked. Neal replied, “Um, I was trying to do it for Snapchat, not going to lie to you.” Obviously not expecting such an answer, the officer sounds taken aback, asking, “Trying to what?” The response from Neal is the same: “Do it for Snapchat,” he said.

Neal was caught in his 2015 Dodge Charger by a stationary radar trap as the officer watched the car accelerate far faster than the traffic around it. The radar measured a speed of 112 mph, nearly twice the 65 mph speed limit of the road, but Neal didn’t state whether his Snap said he was going faster than this, but apparently did admit he knew it was more than 100 mph in his police report. He was charged with reckless driving, and for using a mobile device while driving.

It’s not the first time Snapchat’s speed filter has encouraged someone to drive too fast, and at least one time has ended in a horrific accident. In one high profile incident, Wentworth — who suffered brain damage from the accident — and Karen Maynard were victims in a crash caused by a driver who was using Snapchat, and the Maynards sued both the driver and Snapchat. They alleged that Christal McGee was trying to reach 100 mph on the Snapchat speed filter; however, a judge ruled Snapchat had immunity under the Communications Decency Act, and Snapchat’s attorney was quoted as saying the win “diverted blame,” and encouraged “responsible use of these technologies by the driver.”

Cars

Peloton’s tech lets truckers play follow the leader to boost fuel economy

Peloton Technology can help semi trucks save fuel by running close together on the highway. Using short-range wireless communications, the trucks get a kind of super cruise control.
Mobile

AT&T jumps the gun with deliberately misleading 5GE launch

As excitement about 5G networks continues to build, AT&T jumps the gun with a ridiculous and deliberate attempt to deceive the public with 5G Evolution – a speed bump that’s based on improvements to 4G tech.
Emerging Tech

Short film celebrates New Yorker’s amazing robot costumes

New York City resident Peter Kokis creates stunning robot costumes out of household trash. His designs are huge, heavy, and extremely intricate, and never fail to turn heads when he's out and about.
Gaming

Here's where Xur is and what he has for wares this week in 'Destiny 2: Forsaken'

The weekly vendor in Destiny 2: Forsaken always brings Exotic weapons and armor, some of the toughest loot to find in the game. Here's everything you need to know to track down Xur: Where he is, when he shows up, and what he's stocking.
Photography

Lume Cube wants to help you look your best while livestreaming

You're ready to start a video conference or go live, thenn you realize the lighting is all wrong. The Lume Cube Air VC is a lighting kit designed specifically for video conferencing and livestreaming.
Social Media

Japanese monks hit Twitter to protest driving ticket in the most brilliant way

Cops in Japan told a monk recently that he shouldn't drive a car wearing his traditional robe as its long length and long sleeves might affect his ability to drive safely. His fellow monks came up with a brilliant response.
News

Japanese billionaire splashes the cash to break retweet record

Japanese billionaire entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa has proved again he has a knack for self-publicity after launching a cash-prize contest to break the retweet record. Maezawa is the same man who is hoping to go to the moon with SpaceX.
Social Media

Looking to share some content? Here's how to repost on Instagram

Ever seen a cool picture on Instagram that you wanted to share? There's no official means of reposting content on Instagram, but there are a few workarounds. We break down the two most logical choices for getting the job done.
Computing

Make a GIF of your favorite YouTube video with these great tools

Making a GIF from a YouTube video is easier today than ever, but choosing the right tool for the job isn't always so simple. In this guide, we'll teach you how to make a GIF from a YouTube video with our two favorite online tools.
Photography

Photoshop fail gives Aussie leader two left feet in official portrait

The Aussie prime minister doesn't have two left feet, despite an official photograph of the leader and his family suggesting otherwise. It was, of course, a Photoshop fail, and the embarrassing snafu was soon trending on Twitter.
Social Media

Instagram now lets you post to multiple accounts in one tap

Instagram for iPhone now lets you post to multiple accounts at the same time. It's not the regram feature that many users have been asking for, but it could prove useful for some users who manage more than one profile.
Social Media

No yolk! A photo of an egg has become the most-liked post on Instagram

Until this weekend, the most-liked post on Instagram was of Kylie Jenner's baby daughter, which has around 18 million likes. It's now been knocked off the top spot not by a stunning sunset or even a cute cat, but by an egg.
Social Media

Invite your friends — Facebook Events can now be shared to Stories

Facebook is testing a way to make plans with friends to attend an event -- through Stories. By sharing an event in Facebook Stories, users can message other friends interested in the event to make plans to attend together.