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Wireless syncing comes to Android devices

Two Android apps are bringing wireless syncing capabilities to Android devices this week. The first to be announced is AOL’s latest version of Winamp for Android, which makes the specious claim of being the “first wireless sync on the market that links [a] desktop library with [a] mobile device.” While not technically true — Windows Phone 7 launched with wireless syncing ability and Zune has had this capability since 2008 — it is certain to be a welcome feature for Android users who are looking for opportunities tantalize their iPhone counterparts. The iPhone does not currently support wireless syncing (not without a jailbreak, anyways).

After having downloaded the Winamp 5.6 media player upgrade to a Mac or PC as well as the Winamp for Android app, users will be able to sync music, video, and podcasts to an Android device through a shared Wi-Fi connection. The Winamp 5.6 upgrade also now allows for syncing through iTunes. Both the Winamp media player and the Android app are available as free downloads.

Also coming this week is a new addition to the doubleTwist media player which brings Android-desktop wireless syncing in the form of AirSync. AirSync at a basic level works the same as Winamp: wireless syncing over a shared Wi-Fi connection between a PC or Mac media player. After an initial setup, AirSync also will automatically detect and sync new files from a desktop to a phone after the device is connected to its home Wi-Fi network. AirSync is currently on sale for $0.99 for the first 10,000 people who download the app, after which the price will shoot up to $4.99. The doubleTwist media player is free.