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Facebook code changes mean Windows Phone no longer syncs up with the social network

Based on some updates to Facebook’s Graph API, some of the social network’s integrated features in Windows Phone will no longer work correctly, disabling one of the key features of Microsoft’s mobile operating system. The news comes from Windows Central, and quotes a change to the Facebook Connect support documentation detailed on Microsoft’s Office blog.

Microsoft states that Facebook has altered the Graph API in a way that “impacts apps and services.” Never heard of it? Don’t worry, it’s a behind-the-scenes tool that’s used to connect your Microsoft account with your Facebook account. For example, it adds Facebook friends to Outlook, Windows People, and keeps them in sync, plus it allows photos and videos made on Windows Phone devices, along with those stored in OneDrive, to be quickly and easily shared on Facebook.

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Microsoft bundles all these features together as Facebook Connect, and now the Graph API has changed, the features it provides won’t be supported. What it means is the handy automatic synchronization Windows Phone users have enjoyed since launch will no longer work. Instead, the sharing and syncing will have to be set up manually, in the cases where it’s possible.

According to Microsoft, there are several apps that are affected, including Calendar, Photos, People, OneDrive, Outlook, Contacts, and Movie Maker, all spread across Windows Phone 7, Windows Phone 8, and Windows Phone 8.1. It primarily affects new users in terms of contacts, but existing users may be frustrated by the inability to share photos and check auto calendar updates for birthday reminders in a certain way.

Microsoft isn’t planning to attempt a fix either, and told WinBeta that it’s “proactively working with customers to communicate the changes,” suggesting we’ll be getting workaround instructions in the near future. It’s not a massive surprise Microsoft won’t invest time and effort in altering Windows Phone 8 to compensate, given we’re expecting Windows 10 for Mobile to launch in the next few months.