How to add Bluetooth to your car

Want to keep connected on the road? Here are 5 ways to add Bluetooth to your car

In-vehicle technology has changed drastically in recent years as the industry quickly marches toward self-driving cars, leading many people to wonder whether they need to upgrade their rides with the latest-and-greatest features. If they don’t, they might be stuck with outdated equipment.

Fortunately, there’s another option. Some of the most useful connectivity technologies can be added to older cars with nearly the same ease-of-use and functionality as original equipment (OE) systems. Among these add-ons, the most popular and essential feature is Bluetooth. And since Bluetooth has been around for years, it’s simple to integrate and is extraordinarily versatile.

Within your vehicle, Bluetooth can be used for voice calls (channeling the phone’s audio through your car’s speakers) or to stream music from your smartphone. Some systems are limited to calls, but the majority of aftermarket units can connect both voice and music. As you can imagine, Bluetooth integration can significantly reduce driver distraction, too, making it a fundamental tool for just about anyone. In fact, most states have laws that require hands-free calling while driving.

With this in mind, let’s review the ways you can quickly, easily, and affordably add Bluetooth functionality to your vehicle.

Universal systems

Himbox Bluetooth

If pulling wires apart just isn’t your cup of tea, by far the easiest way to add Bluetooth is with a universal kit, such as the iClever Himbox Plus. As the name implies, these standalone units work in just about any car thanks to a built-in speaker and microphone. Many of these systems clip onto your sun visor or can be mounted wherever you’d like with suction cups or tape.

There are pros and cons to these systems. On the plus side, many universal kits can be easily moved from vehicle to vehicle, so if you do a lot of car swapping and don’t want to pay for multiple units, you can just take the device with you. Unfortunately, systems that don’t wire into your factory audio unit won’t be able to integrate with your phone’s music apps. And, note that mounting the device with tape could leave a nasty mark on your dashboard.

There are a few universal devices that will wire into your head unit and can add music streaming to the list of functionalities, but that makes the installation process a bit more complicated. These devices usually range in price from $15 and $30.

Aftermarket audio units

Replacing your vehicle’s head unit is a great option for those that want the greatest range of audio functionality. This process does require some labor, and you’ll need to embrace the “aftermarket” look of your new system, but most devices come with easy-to-follow instructions. With patience, common tools, and a couple hours, most people can replace their stereo system. Don’t want the hassle? Many electronics stores offer installation for around $100.

There’s a broad range of replacement stereo systems on the market. Fortunately, even the most affordable units feature Bluetooth integration for hands-free calling. As you work up the price ladder, features like Bluetooth music streaming, complete smartphone integration (so you can access your phone’s apps through the car stereo), text messaging (reading your messages out loud so you keep your eyes on the road), and voice commands become available. You can even add units featuring Apple CarPlay or Android Auto.

The sheer number of devices on the market also means you’re likely to find a unit that closely matches your stock setup in color and design. Prices for these devices start as low as $40 and swing up to several hundred dollars for a more feature-rich unit. Top brands such as Pioneer, Alpine, and Kenwood currently offer an array of affordable options.

Vehicle-specific adapters

If you love the look of your vehicle’s stock stereo system and don’t mind getting your wires crossed (no pun intended), then a vehicle-specific adapter with Bluetooth functionality may be perfect for you; Crutchfield and other retailers sell a wide array of them.

The best part of a factory adapter is that it has been specifically engineered for your make and model vehicle, so you’ll have the best possible audio quality and vehicle-specific installation instructions. If you just want Bluetooth for hands-free calling and possibly music streaming (some systems are restricted to phone audio), then there’s no need to replace your entire head unit.

Installation time and difficulty will depend on the manufacturer, but most systems require you to remove the factory stereo, wire in the adapter, and route a wired microphone to the back of the head unit. When all is said and done, you’ll be able to make and answer calls via Bluetooth through your factory system. In addition to maintaining the stock aesthetic, these adapters are usually pretty cheap, with the average setup costing less than $100. Luxury automakers generally charge more for their devices, but hey, what else is new?

FM transmitters

Nulaxy FM transmitter

Buying an FM transmitter is one of the cheapest ways to add Bluetooth to your car, especially if you drive an older model that lacks an auxiliary input. It’s a phone-shaped device that plugs into your car’s cigarette lighter and broadcasts a signal over a clear FM frequency. Set the transmitter to 106.3, for example, tune your radio to that frequency, and you’ll hear the music streaming from your phone or your MP3 player. Most FM transmitters let you make hands-free calls, too.

You can get a decent FM transmitter like this Nulaxy unit for under $20. We like this solution because it’s affordable and there is no installation required; you simply turn it on and set it to your desired frequency. Since FM frequencies vary from region to region, however, a station that’s clear in, say, Reno, could broadcast ’90s hits in Salt Lake City. You’ll often find yourself setting the device to a new frequency if you regularly drive long distances. And, finding a clear frequency in a major city, like San Francisco, is often easier said than done.

Bluetooth receivers

Mpow Bluetooth

A Bluetooth receiver is a compact device that plugs directly into your car’s aux input. Once paired with a phone, it plays music or phone calls through the speakers. It’s similar to the aforementioned FM transmitter but it doesn’t need a clear FM frequency to work, meaning the sound quality is often far better. The catch, of course, is that your car needs to have an aux input. Most late-model cars do, but the device won’t work with older models unless you want to upgrade your stereo.

The list of options on the market is nearly endless, but most units cost around $20. Mpow currently makes one of the better units, one that sports a discreet design and a handful of useful features. For example, when the device is plugged in, users who have downloaded Mpow’s mobile app can use it find their car in the parking lot. Multipoint technology allows you to keep two devices connected, too, meaning you can stream music via an iPod and still take a call on your iPhone.

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