Cornell University is laughing in the face of Moore’s Law

cornell laughs at mooores law u3sadau
Image Credit: Shutterstock/SolarSeven
A research team from Cornell University have announced their successful trials in creating a commercially viable method of producing CPU transistors just three atoms thick.

While Intel brags about its next stage of 10nm processors on the horizon, Cornell’s findings measure only 3nm across, jumping a huge gulf in the ultra-thin market that could have the potential to revolutionize next-generation ultra-thin devices.

The breakthrough is all thanks to chips built with transition metal dichalcogenide, or TMD. TMD is a compound that has been known to technicians for years, but has only recently come into the limelight as its properties became more well understood.

According to an article that was published in Nature detailing Cornell’s success with the material, TMD transistors are currently printing on silicon wafers at a success rate of 99 percent, which is just enough to give the industry hope of full commercial viability sometime in the near future.

We’ve been reporting lately on the struggle that engineers have dealt with, while we face what could be the last 10 years of Moore’s Law. As the boundaries of nature and physics prevent us from having smaller phones, chipmakers and researchers alike have been scrambling to find new ways to break the laws of thermodynamics, using everything from TMDs to graphene to make a tinier, faster chip that doesn’t get so hot that the components inside start to fry.

Related: Intel may turn to Quantum Wells to enforce Moore’s Law

These new TMDs could be a great step in the right direction, though for now they’re just something that was cooked up in a lab. Only time will tell if the process will be scalable up to the kind of production that Intel or AMD are looking for, but we have our fingers crossed.

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: camera with A.I. director, robot arm assistant

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Business

Apple banned from distributing some iPhone models in Germany

Apple is following the FTC's lead and has sued Qualcomm for a massive $1 billion in the U.S., $145 million in China, and also in the U.K., claiming the company charged onerous royalties for its patented tech.
Emerging Tech

Meet Wiliot, a battery-less Bluetooth chip that pulls power from thin air

A tiny chip from a semiconductor company called Wiliot could harvest energy out of thin air, the company claims. No battery needed. The paper-thin device pulls power from ambient radio frequencies like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and cell signals.
Home Theater

New TV? Here's where to go to watch the best 4K content available

Searching for content for your new 4K UHD TV? Look no further. We have every major source of the best 4K content, along with the cost, hardware requirements, and features that make each service worth a look.
Computing

Need a free alternative to Adobe Illustrator? Here are our favorites

Photoshop and other commercial tools can be expensive, but drawing software doesn't need to be. This list of the best free drawing software is just as powerful as some of the more expensive offerings.
Computing

What is fixed wireless 5G? Here’s everything you need to know

Here's fixed wireless 5G explained! Learn what you need to know about this effective new wireless technology, when it's available, how much it costs, and more. If you're thinking about 5G, this guide can help!
Computing

Want a Dell laptop with an RTX 2060? Cross the new XPS 15 off your list

The next iteration of Dell's XPS 15 laptop won't come with an option for an RTX 2060, according to Alienware's Frank Azor. You could always opt for a new Alienware m15 or m17 instead.
Computing

Fix those internet dead zones by turning an old router into a Wi-Fi repeater

Is there a Wi-Fi dead zone in your home or office? A Wi-Fi repeater can help. Don't buy a new one, though. Here is how to extend Wi-Fi range with another router you have lying around.
Computing

Heal your wrist aches and pains with one of these top ergonomic mice

If you have a growing ache in your wrist, it might be worth considering ergonomic mice alternatives. But which is the best ergonomic mouse for you? One of these could be the ticket to the right purchase for you.
Gaming

These are the best indie games you can get on PC right now

Though many indie games now come to consoles as well, there's still a much larger selection on PC. With that in mind, we've created a list of the best indie games for PC, with an emphasis on games that are only available on PC.
Apple

Want a MacBook that will last all day on a single charge? Check these models out

Battery life is one of the most important factors in buying any laptop, especially MacBooks. Their battery life is typically average, but there are some standouts. Knowing which MacBook has the best battery life can be rather useful.
Computing

Always have way too many tabs open? Google Chrome might finally help

Google is one step closer to bringing tab groups to its Chrome browser. The feature is now available in Google's Chrome Canady build with an early implementation that can be enabled through its flag system.
Mobile

Here's how to convert a Kindle book to PDF using your desktop or the web

Amazon's Kindle is one of the best ebook readers on the market, but it doesn't make viewing proprietary files on other platforms any easier. Here's how to convert a Kindle book to PDF using either desktop or web-based applications.
Product Review

Controversy has dogged the MacBook Pro lately. Is it still a good purchase?

The MacBook Pro is a controversial laptop these days -- and that's unfortunate. Due to some divisive changes Apple made to the functionality of the MacBook Pro, fans are more split. Does the 8th-gen refresh change that?