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Download your archive and get ready to bid farewell to Google+ on April 2

After a security vulnerability impacted more than 500,000 of its users, Google announced in late 2018 that it would be shuttering the Google + social network. Now several months later, it is providing an update on the shutdown, noting that after April 2 all content on the platform will be deleted.

Though the date is still a couple months away, Google is warning that starting April 2, all Google+ pages will be removed. Content from personal Google+ accounts will also be deleted on the date, including photos and videos from Google+ in Album Archives. In the meantime, an archive of all your important information and specific data from the social network can still be downloaded easily  According to Google, the full deletion process will take a few months, and some Google+ content might remain visible to G Suite users.

To prepare for the full shutdown, Google will remove the ability to create new Google+ profiles, pages, communities or events by February 4. You will also notice that Google+ sign-in buttons will stop working in the coming weeks, though you will still be able to sign in with your Google account as an alternate. Finally, if you’ve used Google+ as a comment system with Blogger, the feature will be removed by March 7, with full deletion coming on April 2.

“From all of us on the Google+ team, thank you for making Google+ such a special place. We are grateful for the talented group of artists, community builders, and thought leaders who made Google+ their home. It would not have been the same without your passion and dedication,” Google said.

Google originally cited a lack of engagement as part of its decision to shutter Google+. It claimed that the consumer version of the social network had low usage and engagement, with 90 percent of user sessions lasting than five seconds.

For anyone that still actively uses the social media platform, Google does have a suggestion on how to stay in touch with members of the community. “Between now and the shutdown, we recommend you let your followers know where they can see your content outside of Google+. Consider creating a post that lists your website, blog, social media channels, and other ways to stay in touch,” Google said.

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Arif Bacchus
Arif Bacchus is a native New Yorker and a fan of all things technology. Arif works as a freelance writer at Digital Trends…
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