Magic Leap’s augmented reality interface floats wherever you want it

There are no standards for what a virtual or augmented reality user interface should look like, but in the case of Magic Leap, it could be a blend of floating icons in wheels and grids. New mock-up screenshots of what users will see through their augmented reality goggles have been released, showing that menus and icons will be used in both 2D and 3D forms, but in each case will float a customizable distance from the user. With enough space, headset wearers will be able to operate several different menus at the same time, even pinning them in place if needed.

In Magic Leap’s operating system, there will be two distinctive classes of menu systems. The first, known as “Landscape” applications, will use traditional grid and wheel designs to showcase content and options across a 2D pane. Where the menu displays its information and at what distance, will be customizable by the user. Several “menus,” such as galleries of images, or a larger virtual display could operate side by side or in front of one another if that was preferable.

“Immersive” apps, will conform to the environment around them, letting them sit atop a tabletop or ‘break through’ a wall, or hang from the ceiling. Like the Landscape apps, the menus in Immersive applications will be customizable by the user, but they will also take more guidance from the geometry of the space around them.

User controls will involve hand-tracking inputs with drag-and-drop ability, as well as pointer-tracked taps. For more in-depth inputs like typing, virtual keyboards can be displayed to the viewer at whatever angle is most comfortable for them. TechCrunch reports that there will also be options for hardware accessories like Bluetooth keyboards for those who prefer the feel of physical peripherals under their fingertips.

All of this information is available in more depth in Magic Leap’s Creator portal, which has a long list of guidelines and recommendations for developers looking to make content for the augmented reality platform. It suggests that Immersive applications need to allow for smooth entry into and out of the experiences, to prevent them from being jarring and that no matter what kind of app is being created, it should be geared toward enabling multitasking.

Photography

Photo FOMO: Leica Elpro turns plain lenses into macro, Fujifilm Fest returns

In this week's photo industry news, Leica launches a way to turn plain lenses into macro lenses. Artificial Intelligence keeps growing with new uses with Getty Images and the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 camera.
Social Media

How to use Adobe Spark Post to spice up your social media images

Images are proven to get more likes than plain text -- but only if those images are good. Adobe Spark post is an AI-powered design program for non-designers. Here's how to use it to take your social media feeds to the next level.
Computing

Apple AR glasses will launch in 2020, says respected industry analyst

Apple AR glasses may be closer to reality than we thought. Here is everything we know so far about the augmented reality system, including the rumored specifications of Apple's Project Mirrorshades.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

Amazon Prime brings more perks than just free two-day shipping. Subscribers get access to a huge library of TV shows to stream at no extra cost. Here are our favorite TV shows currently available on Amazon Prime.
Computing

Windows 10 can split and resize windows with ease. Here's how to do it

Windows 10 is a great desktop operating system, and its many window management features are part of the reason why. Here's how to divvy up windows using Snap Assist and other native tools.
Mobile

Google One subscriptions offer more cloud storage for low prices, other perks

Can't get enough storage on Google Drive, Photos, or Gmail? Google One is the new way to boost your cloud storage. But it's not just about more space -- Google One comes with a loads of benefits.
Photography

A turn for the better: Loupedeck+ adds custom dials, more to Lightroom console

The Loupedeck+ improves on the original Lightroom console by adding welcome customization options and introducing support for Skylum Aurora HDR. What's even better is that it does this all at an even lower price.
Computing

Intel serves up ‘Bean Canyon’ NUCs revved with ‘Coffee Lake’ CPUs

Looking for a super-compact PC for streaming media that doesn’t break the bank? Intel updated its NUC family with its new “Bean Canyon” kits. Currently, there are five with a starting price of $300 packing eighth-generation Intel Core…
Deals

Save hundreds with the best MacBook deals for August 2018

If you’re in the market for a new Apple laptop, let us make your work a little easier: We hunted down the best up-to-date MacBook deals available online right now from various retailers.
Computing

Lost without 'Print Screen'? Here's how to take a screenshot on a Chromebook

Chrome OS has a number of built-in screenshot options, and can also be used with Chrome screenshot extensions for added flexibility. You have a lot of options, but learning how to take a screenshot on a Chromebook is easy.
Computing

Gaming on a laptop has never been better. These are your best options

Gaming desktops are powerful, but they tie you down to your desk. For those of us who prefer a more mobile experience, here are the best gaming laptops on the market, ranging from budget machines to maxed-out, wallet-emptying PCs.
Computing

A dead pixel doesn't mean a dead display. Here's how to repair it

Dead pixel got you down? We don't blame you. Check out our guide on how to fix a dead pixel and save yourself that costly screen replacement, or an unwanted trip to your local repair shop.
Computing

Asus claims ‘world’s thinnest’ title with its new Zephyrus S gaming laptop

The Republic of Gamers arm at Asus is claiming “world’s thinnest” with the introduction of its new Zephyrus S gaming laptop measuring just 0.58 inches at its thinnest point. The company also revealed the Strix SCAR II.
Computing

Intel teases new dedicated graphics card slated for 2020 release

Intel has confirmed plans to launch a dedicated graphics card in 2020. Although precious few details exist for the card at this time, it was silhouetted in a recent Intel video showcased at Siggraph 2018.