Aerial video shows Apple’s ‘spaceship’ HQ nearly complete

Apple’s striking “spaceship” campus in Cupertino is now only six months away from completion, with the latest flyover video offering dramatic shots of the main donut-shaped building as well as other parts of the complex such as the eye-catching entrance to the underground auditorium and a view of the research and development buildings.

Using a DJI Phantom 3 Professional quadcopter, drone enthusiast Matthew Roberts has been offering monthly updates as the massive construction project nears its conclusion. According to his latest video, serious progress has been made with the huge solar panels on the roof of the main building. It’s estimated that once up and running, the panels will be able to take care of around 75 percent of the building’s energy needs during peak time. Work is also well underway on fitting the building’s 3,000 floor-to-ceiling glass panels, as well as the canopies to help shield staff from the California sun.

We also get to see the auditorium lobby now fitted with the world’s biggest carbon-fiber roof. The auditorium itself, which has around 1,000 seats, is underground, which explains the piles of geofoam nearby. The material will be used beneath the mud landscaping above the auditorium, with its light weight helping to ease the pressure on the cavernous space beneath.

The large research and development facility looks almost ready, a place where Jony Ive and his team will be endeavoring to cook up Apple’s next big thing, or simply bashing out ideas for tweaks to future iterations of the iPhone.

Roberts also gives us a decent view of the 100,000-square-foot fitness center, as well as the parking areas, described as “95 percent complete” and which also feature solar panel roofs.

The campus covers about 176 acres and will incorporate office space across four floors. The structure, which’ll be home to some 14,000 Apple employees when it opens toward the end of this year or early next, is the work of the acclaimed British architect Norman Foster, though the project was the long-time ambition of Steve Jobs, who helped develop the plan until his death in 2011.

Emerging Tech

Researchers gave alligators headphones and ketamine, and all for a good cause

Researchers in Germany and the United States recently gave ketamine and earphones to alligators to monitor how they process sounds. Here's what it reveals about alligator evolution.
Web

Switch up your Reddit routine with these interesting, inspiring, and zany subs

So you've just joined the wonderful world of Reddit and want to explore it. But with so many subreddits to choose from, exploring them can be overwhelming. Here are some of the best subreddits to get you started.
Mobile

Apple iPad Mini 5 vs. iPad Mini 4: What’s new in Apple’s long-awaited refresh?

The long-awaited refresh of the iPad Mini is finally here, but just how big an upgrade does the iPad Mini 5 represent? We compare it to the outgoing iPad Mini 4 in various categories to delve into the differences and pick a winner.
Deals

It’s time to check out the best Apple Watch deals for March 2019

The Apple Watch has surged to prominence in recent years. If you're in the market for an iOS wearable, we've sniffed out the best Apple Watch deals available right now for all three models of this great smartwatch.
Mobile

How to choose an iPad in 2019: A practical guide to Apple’s tablets

Selecting an iPad from Apple's lineup can be intimidating, but it doesn't have to be. Our comprehensive guide should put the numbers and specs in practical, easy-to-understand terms. Find your ideal iPad with the help of our guide.
Emerging Tech

Cheese tastes different when it listens to Led Zeppelin, Swiss study finds

A funky new study says that exposing cheese to music changes its aroma and flavor. What’s more, the genre of music matters. Researchers from the Bern University of Arts played music to nine, 22-pound wheels of Emmental cheese.
Emerging Tech

Twitter is officially a teenager now. Are we raising a monster?

On March 21, 2006, Jack Dorsey sent the first ever tweet. Thirteen years later, Twitter has fundamentally changed the way we communicate. Here are some of the myriad ways it's done that.
Emerging Tech

Astronomers plan to beam Earth’s greatest hits into deep space, and you can help

A new project from the SETI Institute (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) will give the public the chance to submit compositions to be beamed into space, with the aim of connecting people around the world through music.
Emerging Tech

Scientists have a way to turn off alcoholism: Blasting the brain with lasers

Researchers from Scripps Research have demonstrated that it is possible to reverse the desire to drink in alcohol-dependent rats by targeting a part of the brain using lasers. Here's how.
Emerging Tech

China has cloned its best police dog. Now it wants to mass-produce more

Scientists in China have cloned the Sherlock Holmes of police sniffer dogs, with possible plans to mass produce it in the future. Here's why its creators think that's a great idea.
Emerging Tech

Scientists use drone to map Icelandic cave in preparation for Mars exploration

Researchers from the SETI Institute and Astrobotic Technology have demonstrated a way that astronauts may be able to map Martian caves using a Lidar-equipped drone that can travel autonomously without GPS.
Emerging Tech

A 3D printer the size of a small barn will produce entire homes in Saudi Arabia

If you’re looking for a 3D printer that can comfortably fit on the side of your desk… well, Danish company Cobod International’s enormous new 3D house printer probably isn’t for you.
Deals

Need a ride? Amazon is slashing prices on popular electric scooters

If you’re not much of a cyclist or if you’re looking for a lazier way to zip about town, an electric scooter should be right up your alley. Two of our favorites, the foldable Glion Dolly and the eco-friendly Razor scooter, are on sale…
Emerging Tech

Unexpected particle plumes discovered jetting out of asteroid Bennu

The OSIRIS-REx craft traveled to asteroid Bennu last year and won't return until 2023. But the mission is already throwing up unexpected findings, like plumes of particles which are being ejected from the surface of the asteroid.