Who needs bug spray? Wristband scares off mosquitoes by mimicking a thunderstorm

Anyone who has been caught in a summer storm knows that it kind of sucks. Evidently, mosquitoes think the same thing, as they apparently choose to seek shelter when they sense an approaching storm, rather than risk hanging out and biting people. Who can blame them, right? Well, maybe no one can blame them, but smart engineers can certainly jump on that evolutionary quirk to find a new way of fending off everyone’s least favorite blood-drinking insects.

That’s where the Nopixgo wristband comes into play. According to its creators, it emits very weak electromagnetic signals, which essentially convince mosquitos that a storm is brewing and they should probably be packing their bags to leave. It’s a smart solution that protects users without the use of chemicals.

“When mosquitoes enter into the reach of the signal, they become more passive, flying closer to the ground in search of lower vegetation and protection, and their instinct to bite and suck blood is overridden by the instinct to survive,” Johan Niklasson, chief business development officer at NopixGlobal, told Digital Trends. “This is a revolutionary new way to approach mosquito bites. In a way, the mosquitoes’ own genetics is used against them; something they cannot adapt to and avoid. It goes deeper than just repelling with bad smells or irritating sounds. No one has ever tried this before, and the technology has not existed to make this possible until just recently.”

nopixgo mosquito wearable thunderstorm ibp1804

The technology was developed by inventor Kurt Stoll, who learned firsthand what a severe problem it is after meeting children in Africa who had become infected by malaria, one of the diseases frequently transmitted by mosquito. He teamed up with fellow Swiss entrepreneur Richard Karlsson, and together they honed this device over the past two years.

As ever, we offer our usual warnings about the risks inherent in crowdfunding campaigns, of which this is one. However, if you still wish to get involved, head over to the Nopixgo Kickstarter page to pledge your cash. A single rechargeable wristband, which has a battery life of around one week before needing to be replenished, will set you back around $70. Shipping is set to take place in October.

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