Smart bandage uses nanosensors to track how a wound is healing

smart bandages track wound healing 33909734 l
Antonio Diaz/123RF
Bandages are intended to keep a dressing secure and clean in order to reduce healing time and infection rate. However, they may be about to get a new use-case, courtesy of a project from the United Kingdom’s Swansea University Institute of Life Science.

What researchers there have been working on is a new smart bandage capable of tracking how a wound is healing and sending that data back to doctors, via 5G technology. To do this it would employ tiny “nanosensors” able to fit comfortably within the fabric of regular bandages.

The resulting smart bandage would allow doctors and caregivers to know exactly at which stage in the recovery process a wound is, thereby allowing them to tailor their treatment more accurately for the patient.

“Chronic wound management is an initial focus for development, and early application as it is a major challenge for health systems,” Marc Clement, chairman of the Institute of Life Science, told Digital Trends. “Supporting this management outside of the hospital setting. Increasing rates of diabetes and other contributory factors compound this need.”

Unfortunately, Clement wouldn’t spill more details about how exactly the tech works, since the smart bandage concept integrates a number of commercially sensitive technologies its investors are hoping to protect for commercial purposes.

However, the hope is that this technology will be able to be trialed as soon as the next 12 months. “The next stage of research involves integration of the concept into clinical applications [and] pathways, and testing of core technologies,” Clement continued. This work will reportedly involve experts from the Welsh Wound Innovation Centre.

There’s no word on exactly when smart bandages might be available to the general public, but Swansea University is clear about its focus on being at the forefront of the intersection between technology and healthcare. In June this year, it will host a one-day symposium on “Digital Futures in health and well-being,” questioning whether public services can survive without embracing smart technology.

Smart Home

With Personal Food Computers, nerd farmers are finding the best way to grow

MIT research scientist Caleb Harper wants to grow basil designed to prevent heart disease. It involves a personal food computer, climate manipulation, and open sourcing food. One day, your doctor could prescribe you a diet of food grown…
Emerging Tech

Doctors could soon ditch stitches and seal skin wounds with lasers

Just like the dermal regenerator in Star Trek, physicians may soon be able to heal skin wounds using smart, laser-based technology. That's thanks to researchers from Arizona State University.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

There's more to Amazon Prime than free two-day shipping, including access to a number of phenomenal shows at no extra cost. To make the sifting easier, here are our favorite shows currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Emerging Tech

Stronger than steel, thinner than paper, graphene could be the future of tech

Since its discovery, graphene has set the research world on fire. What exactly is it, though, and what could it mean for the future of tech? Here's everything you need to know about what could be the next supermaterial to take center stage.
Emerging Tech

SpaceX’s Big Falcon Rocket goes bolder, changes its name to Starship

Elon Musk has revealed that he's changing the name of SpaceX's Big Falcon Rocket to the grander Starship. It's getting a redesign and may even be one day used to visit other star systems trillions of miles away.
Deals

This all-in-one shaving system lets you use over 40 blades from different brands

Trazor shaving system gives you the ability to shave using most of your favorite blades from various brands like Gillette and Schick. It even squirts out water, shaving gel, and aftershave making it an ideal solution for traveling.
Emerging Tech

Internet of cows? Smart ear tag takes cattle tracking into the future

An Australian startup wants to bring cattle farming into the present day with smart ear tags capable of revealing where herds are grazing, and even if animals are sick or about to give birth.
Emerging Tech

The best drone photos from around the world

Most of today's drones come equipped with high-end cameras, which are quickly revolutionizing the world of aerial photography as we know it. Here are some of the best drone photos from around the world.
Photography

DJI’s Ronin-S just got more capable with slew of new accessories

Need a longer battery life for the DJI Ronin-S, or perhaps a built-in screen, GPS, or universal mount? DJI has got you covered with a handful of new accessories for the company's one-hand gimbal.
Emerging Tech

Drones can safely fly a human kidney without damaging it, study shows

Drone deliveries are well on their way. Could they also be used for safely delivering transplant organs to hospitals without damage? A recent test flight attempted to find an answer.
Emerging Tech

Novameat’s 3D-printed ‘steak’ looks gross, but could it save the planet?

A Spanish startup called Novameat is developing a 3D-printed beefsteak, made using a paste composed of vegetable-based materials like rice, peas, and seaweed. Get ready for the future of food!
Smart Home

Most completely unnecessary ways to cook your turkey this Thanksgiving

Cooking the ol' Thanksgiving Day turkey in the oven can take hours. That said, why use a traditional oven when you can just as easily incinerate the bird with a jet engine? Here are the most insane ways to cook a turkey.
Emerging Tech

14 White elephant gift ideas that are guaranteed to spice up your holiday party

To help you make a splash at your holiday party this year, we've put together a quick list of the best White Elephant gift ideas the world has ever seen. Proceed with caution!
Emerging Tech

Dangle no more: Window-washing drone for towers could replace human cleaners

The maker of a window-washing drone for tall buildings claims it can do the job 20 times faster than humans and is much safer than using workers in cradles that dangle on the side of buildings.