Control this toy racing car without actually touching anything

Why use a joystick when you can just flick your wrist? That’s the question Ultigesture is asking now that it’s debuted its new toy racing cars that promise to be “intuitively controlled by gestures from the wristband-wearing driver.” That’s right — no more fiddling around with remotes. Now, your body is all your need to drive a car; even a miniature one.

Your gestures will tell the racing car to do just about everything it can. Whether you want it to move in a different direction, speed up, slow down, or stop altogether, you can do it with your wearable-clad wrist. Promising a more natural and connected driving experience, Ultigesture believes it’s come up with the ultimate toy for racing enthusiasts.

“There are plenty of remote-controlled toy cars which are fun to play, but we have discovered that wearing the wristband and using gestures makes for a much more realistic racing experience,” said Gang Zhou, CEO, Ultigesture. “The user experience is really improved by literally putting your body — or at least your arm — into the driving. It is very exciting to feel like you are connected to this small toy car as it goes racing down the street.”

Low power Bluetooth is all the wristband needs to power your car; when you raise your forearm, your car will go forward, and if you lower your arm, it’ll go backwards. Turn your writs clockwise and the car will go right, and go counter-clockwise to get it to go left. And thanks to the band’s accelerometer, you can control the speed of the car with your wearable as well.

Ultigesture can hit a top speed of 13 mph, and the car itself comes in at 13 inches, weighs 17 ounces, and six different color choices.

“We want to make remote control racing cars that are really cool and intuitive. With the wristband and gestures, it is amazing how much closer you feel to the car — especially when you compare it with using a remote controller,” Zhou concluded.

The gesture-controlled car and wristband are now available for pre-order now Ultigesture’s Kickstarter campaign for $89 with an estimated delivery date of August 2017.

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