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New York boy, 6, burned after Samsung Galaxy Note 7 explodes in his hands

A person holding the Samsung Galaxy Note 7
Digital Trends
A six-year-old Brooklyn boy was hospitalized Saturday night after sustaining burns when one of Samsung’s recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones exploded in his hands, reports the NY Post.

According to Linda Lewis, her grandson was using a Galaxy Note 7 to watch videos when the phone caught fire. The smoke caused the alarms to go off, though the family also called 911.

The boy was rushed to Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, where the burns on his body were treated. Lewis said he is now at home but has been negatively affected by the experience.

“He is home now,” said Lewis. “He doesn’t want to see or go near any phones. He’s been crying to his mother.”

Lewis also said the family has been in contact with Samsung regarding the incident, but did not say what the nature of their contact is. Even so, the family is likely pretty upset with Samsung and the Galaxy Note 7’s faulty battery.

Samsung originally announced a global Galaxy Note 7 recall on September 2, through which owners could go to their carrier and ask for an exchange, though further specifics depend on the carrier. However, the company announced it will issue a full recall in the U.S. by collaborating with the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), though no timetable was given as to when the full recall will go into effect.

Until then, however, Samsung advises Galaxy Note 7 owners to stop using the phone and power it off in order to prevent explosions like the one that affected Lewis’ family. Carriers and even the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) also advise folks to stop using the phablet, and for good reason. As of September 2, as many as 35 Galaxy Note 7 owners documented their units catching fire, with the phone having possibly set someone’s house on fire.

The recall looks to cost Samsung as much as $1 billion.

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