Facebook will augment the basic ‘Like’ with anger, sadness, laughter, but no dislike

Update on January 27, 2016: Bloomberg reports that Reactions will be available globally “in the next few weeks.” The comment comes from an interview Bloomberg conducted with Facebook’s chief product officer, Chris Cox.

Original article: Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg revealed plans to add a “dislike” button to the social network a few months ago, and earlier today the new reactions were finally revealed. Instead of a simple ‘thumbs down’ button, which Facebook claims would be ineffective and possibly abusive, the social network has added a range of reactions, including love, haha, wow, sad, and angry.

The angry face is as close as we’re going to get to a dislike. Facebook wanted to add the reactions for times when a ‘thumbs up’ isn’t appropriate. The emotes use a similar style to one of Facebook’s packs found on Messenger, and the ‘love’ reaction from Instagram makes an appearance. Here’s the firm’s related statement:

“Today we’re launching a pilot test of Reactions — a more expressive Like button. As you can see, it’s not a “dislike” button, though we hope it addresses the spirit of this request more broadly. We studied which comments and reactions are most commonly and universally expressed across Facebook, then worked to design an experience around them that was elegant and fun. Starting today Ireland and Spain can start loving, wow-ing, or expressing sympathy to posts on Facebook by hovering or long-pressing the Like button wherever they see it. We’ll use the feedback from this to improve the feature and hope to roll it out to everyone soon.”

Reactions will work on mobile by tapping on the like button, and on desktop by hovering over the like button. The reactions will be viewable at the bottom of the status update, with small numbers to indicate how many people used this reaction. Facebook has removed the names of people that liked the status, but hovering on desktop or tapping on mobile will show all of the names.

The new reactions could be open to abuse, but not on the scale of an actual dislike button. Facebook plans to continue tweaking the reactions, and some time in the future we might see them open up the reactions to third-party artists, similar to Messenger emoticons.

A small rollout in Ireland and Spain will happen before making reactions available to everybody. Like most new features from Facebook, we expect it will take some time to come to the 1.4 billion active monthly users.

Most social networks deal in one or two reactions: on Twitter, retweet and favorite are the two options, on Instagram users can only heart, and YouTube is the only social network to offer a like and dislike button. Facebook’s new reactions might be an interesting experiment to see what reactions users favor, and how behavior changes on the social network when multiple reactions, including unfavorable ones, are available.

(This article was originally published on October 8, 2015.)

Emerging Tech

Twitter is officially a teenager now. Are we raising a monster?

On March 21, 2006, Jack Dorsey sent the first ever tweet. Thirteen years later, Twitter has fundamentally changed the way we communicate. Here are some of the myriad ways it's done that.
Photography

Insta-checkout? New Instagram service lets you shop without leaving the platform

Shopping on Instagram no longer means leaving the platform to checkout in a web browser. Instagram checkout launched in beta today with a handful of retailers, allowing users to checkout without leaving the app.
Movies & TV

'Prime'-time TV: Here are the best shows on Amazon Prime right now

There's more to Amazon Prime than free two-day shipping, including access to a number of phenomenal shows at no extra cost. To make the sifting easier, here are our favorite shows currently streaming on Amazon Prime.
Gaming

How you can share your best gaming moments with friends on the PS4

Check out Digital Trends' quick guide to everything you need to know to save your outstanding PlayStation 4 gameplay moments, share them online, and transfer them to your computer.
Mobile

Need a quick battery boost? Try one of our favorite portable chargers

Battery life still tops the polls when it comes to smartphone concerns. If it’s bugging you, then maybe it’s time to snag yourself a portable charger. Here are our picks for the best portable chargers.
Mobile

You can now listen to Google Podcasts on your desktop without the app

The Google Podcasts app is no longer entirely necessary to listen to the podcasts it offers. With a simple tweak of the sharing URL, you can listen to a Google Podcasts podcast on your desktop or laptop without the app.
Mobile

The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G might be a few short weeks away from launch

Samsung has announced a whopping four new Galaxy S10 devices, from the low-cost S10e to the triple-camera S10 and S10 Plus. But it's the Galaxy S10 5G that steals the show as it's among the first 5G-ready smartphones to hit the market.
Computing

T-Mobile goes after big cable companies, pilots wireless home internet service

In a shot at big cable companies, T-Mobile is launching a new pilot program to bring an unlimited wireless LTE home internet service to up to 50,000 homes across the United States by the end of 2019.
Mobile

Type away on the best iPad keyboard cases, from the Mini to the Pro

Whether you're looking to replace your laptop with a tablet or merely want to increase your typing speed, a physical iPad keyboard is the perfect companion to the iPad. Check out our top picks for every available iPad model.
Mobile

Apple patent suggests Apple Watch bands could have built-in fitness indicators

Apple may be exploring ways to make Apple Watch bands a little more useful. A new patent has been filed by Apple that suggests Apple Watch bands could eventually have indicators for things like fitness goals.
Mobile

Apple patents hint at improved Apple Store and unboxing experiences

It looks like Apple is working on ways to improve the Apple Store and product unboxing experiences. The company has been awarded a few patents, largely for tech that can be used in product packaging to ensure products stay charged.
Wearables

Fossil made a smartwatch in 2004, and it’s part of a new brand retrospective

Fossil has been making watches for 35 years, and to celebrate the anniversary, it has a new retrospective exhibit complete with the first smartwatch it made — the Wrist Net watch from 2004.
Deals

Make some time for the best smartwatch deals for March 2019

Smartwatches make your life easier by sending alerts right on your wrist. Many also provide fitness-tracking features. So if you're ready to take the plunge into wearables and want to save money, read on for the best smartwatch deals.
Wearables

Fossil is working on a smartwatch with BMW, and it’s coming next year

Fossil, the watch company that makes smartwatches under its own name and partners with other major brands too, intends to launch a smartwatch with car manufacturer BMW in the future.