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Meyer Optik to resurrect Primoplan 58mm f/1.9 ‘wonder bokeh’ lens


As of late, a trend has arisen that favors the revival of old, classic lenses for modern-day DSLRs. One of the most recent lenses to get a redesign was Meyer Optik’s Trioplan ‘soap bubble bokeh’ lens, which was first announced last year. Now, Meyer Optik is back at it again with a redesign of its Primoplan ‘wonder bokeh’ 58mm f/1.9 lens.

80 years after Meyer Optik engineer Paul Schaefter created the optical formula for the lens, Meyer Optik is bringing it back for a new generation of cameras and photographers.

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Image used with permission by copyright holder

Much like its Trioplan sibling, the defining feature of the Primoplan is its ability to create multiple bokeh effects, all within a single lens design destined for Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony E, Fuji X, Micro Four Thirds, M42, Pentax K, and Leica M mounts.

Meyer Optik describes the bokeh of the Primoplan 58mm f/1.9 as a ‘dreamlike diffluence of hazy bubbles in the bokeh, discreetly swirling around the center of the image.’ Below are a few photos of the lens and its bokeh in action:

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© Raffaele Horstmann Image used with permission by copyright holder
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© Benedikt Hartmann Image used with permission by copyright holder
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© Firat Bagdu Image used with permission by copyright holder
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© Tamara Skudies Image used with permission by copyright holder

It features an aperture range of f/1.9–22, a 12-blade aperture diaphragm, and is made up of five elements in four groups. Its filter size is 37mm and it comes in at roughly 200g.

Prototypes have already been developed, but mass production is yet to begin, pending the success of the Kickstarter. Already though, the Kickstarter campaign has amassed almost 10 times the original $50,000 funding goal, ensuring production should begin (short of a catastrophic failure).

Meyer Optik says the first units should start shipping around February or March 2017. Currently, a $600 pledge will get you the lens, but there are only a few spots left. Once they’re taken, the lowest price will be $650. Still, that’ll be a great deal less than the $1,500 it’s expected to retail for down the road.

Considering the success of previous Kickstarter campaigns by Meyer Optik, it is unlikely that the product will fail to come to fruition. But, as always with crowdfunding, it’s still a possibility.

For more information, head on over to the campaign.

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