Click the new 'i' button in Facebook to see if you're reading fake news

Crisis Response Hub
Emevil/123RF
It’s been nearly 12 months since the U.S. election and the popularization of the term “fake news,” and Facebook is still fighting to ensure that the articles shown on its platform convey accurate information. As such, the social media giant has begun a new test designed to give users “additional context on the articles they see in News Feed.” Intended to help individuals make more informed decisions about the types of news that they read, share, and ultimately, believe, the new “i” button will give readers additional information about the source.

Article Context

Posted by Facebook on Wednesday, October 4, 2017

If you’re one of the users Facebook has chosen to participate in the test, you’ll see this little button in the upper right-hand corner above an article’s title. If you tap this button, you’ll be able to find additional contextual information about the publisher that is “pulled from across Facebook and other sources, such as information from the publisher’s Wikipedia entry, a button to follow their Page, trending articles, or related articles about the topic, and information about how the article is being shared by people on Facebook.”

As Facebook product manager Sara Su told TechCrunch, “People have told us that they want more information about what they’re reading. They want better tools to help them understand if an article is from a publisher they trust and evaluate if the story itself is credible.” And this is Facebook’s answer.

The feature is the latest tool to emerge from the Facebook Journalism Project, which has been combatting the spread of faulty information for many months, particularly around elections. But even if there isn’t an election around the corner, giving folks access to “important contextual information can help them evaluate if articles are from a publisher they trust, and if the story itself is credible.” The social network noted that the test is just in its beginning stages, and that user and publisher feedback will be taken into consideration moving forward.

In a blog post announcement, Facebook noted that most business Pages will not see “any significant changes to their distribution in News Feed as a result of this test.” That said, Pages are encouraged to use publishing best practices and post stories that will resonate with readers and are, of course, not fake news.

Gaming

Google’s Stadia is the future of gaming, and that’s bad news for our planet

Google’s upcoming Stadia cloud gaming service, and its competitors, are ready to change the way gamers play, but in doing so they may kick off a new wave of data center growth – with unfortunate consequences for the environment.
Social Media

Geek out for premieres or get lost in related threads with Reddit’s new tools

Can't find the Game of Thrones thread until after the episode already aired? Reddit's new event tool allows users to get alerts when an event is about to start, such as a premiere. The collections tool also helps organize related posts.
Movies & TV

Best new podcasts: The Ballad of Billy Balls, Decomposed, and more

Feel like you’re drowning in podcasts? In this weekly series, we’ll help you pick out the best of the new and returning shows. This week’s picks include a punk love story, disappearing referees, gun court, and intriguing tales from…
Emerging Tech

Russia’s robot news anchor gives human TV presenters hope

Human news anchors anxious about robots taking their jobs will be feeling reassured this week after the appearance on Russian TV of a news-reading android that clearly needs a bit of work.
Social Media

How to download Instagram Stories on iOS, Android, and desktop

Curious about how to save someone's Instagram Story to your phone? Lucky for you, it can be done -- but it does take a few extra steps. Here's what you need to know to save Instagram Stories on both iOS and Android.
Social Media

Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp went down worldwide for 2 hours this morning

Chaos erupted on the internet this morning, as Facebook, Instagram, and Whatsapp all went down from 6:30 a.m. to approximately 9 a.m. Thousands of users were unable to access the sites or send or receive Whatsapp messages.
Mobile

Skype screen sharing for mobile will let you share your swipes on dating apps

Skype is prepping the launch of screen sharing for mobile so you can share your swipes on dating apps, shop with buddies, or, perhaps, show a PowerPoint presentation to coworkers. It's in beta just now, but anyone can try it.
Social Media

Facebook toys with mixing Stories and News Feed into one swipeable carousel

Facebook's News Feed could look a lot like Stories if a prototype the social media giant is working on rolls out to users. The design change mixes Stories and News Feed posts into a full-screen slideshow that users swipe left to navigate.
Social Media

No more moon showers as Facebook Messenger’s dark mode gets official rollout

Facebook Messenger launched a dark mode last month, but to activate it you had to message the crescent moon to someone. Now it's been rolled out officially, and it can be accessed in a far more sensible way — via settings.
News

Twitter has revealed a launch date for its handy hide replies features

Twitter has revealed a launch date for a feature that lets users hide replies to their tweets. The hope is that it will help the original poster filter out offensive or irrelevant content from conversation threads.
Smart Home

Oh, Zuck, no! Facebook rumored to be creating a voice assistant to rival Alexa

Facebook hasn't been a big player in the smart speaker market, but that may be changing: The social media giant is reportedly working on a digital assistant to compete against Alexa and others.
Social Media

Facebook says it unintentionally uploaded email contacts of 1.5 million users

Facebook says that over the last two years it unintentionally uploaded the email contacts of 1.5 million users as they signed up to the social networking service. The process has ended and the email addresses are being deleted.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Facebook data security, Ubisoft helps Notre Dame, and more

Join DT Live as we discuss Facebook security issues, Ubisoft's plan to help rebuild Notre Dame, and more. We are also joined by Emily Teteut of Snap the Gap, Jennifer Sendrow of New York Public Radio, and DJ and producer Zeke Thomas.
Photography

After controversial video, China bans ‘Leica’ on social media

A video that referenced Tiananmen Square got the name of the camera company Leica banned from the social media platform Weibo. Leica says the video wasn't an officially sanctioned promotion.