First McLaren Senna to arrive in North America shines like an emerald

The McLaren Senna is one of the most talked about new cars of the year, and now the first one has landed on North American soil. The supercar was handed over to entrepreneur and car collector Michael Fux in New York City. At first glance, the car’s emerald hue may seem like classic British Racing Green, but it’s actually a custom color called “Fux Green,” according to McLaren. Fux made a splash last year when his fuchsia McLaren 720S dropped jaws during its debut at Monterey Car Week.

A car like the Senna could never be called restrained, but the green exterior is a bit more subdued than what we often see on supercars. The interior features matching green-tinted carbon fiber, white leather upholstery with green stitching, and a black Alcantara headliner. McLaren also painted the door struts and rearview mirror green.

Named after legendary Brazilian Formula One driver Ayrton Senna, who won three championships with McLaren, the supercar is powered by a 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged V8 that produces 789 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque. McLaren says it will do 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds, and reach a top speed of 211 mph. While not the prettiest car in the world, the body can generate a staggering 1,763.7 pounds of downforce, according to McLaren. If that’s not good enough, there’s an even more hardcore Senna GTR on the way.

Like all current McLarens, the Senna features a carbon fiber “tub” chassis, similar to a race car. The Senna’s chassis is the same Monocage II unit used for the 720S. On top of that foundation go 67 distinct body components, according to McLaren, which together take almost 1,000 hours to produce. That helps explain the Senna’s estimated price tag of around $1 million. The entire 500-unit production run is already sold out, with approximately one-third of the cars ordered by North American customers, according to McLaren.

The “Fux Green” McLaren Senna will be displayed at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering during Monterey Car Week on August 24, among what will likely be plenty of other drool-worthy machinery. McLaren has another supercar in the pipeline. Code-named BP23, McLaren describes it as a “Hyper-GT” that will be the spiritual successor to the legendary F1.

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