Google helps you control all your data in a new About Me page

next gen chromebook pixel google  2015 1 000
Google is nothing if not a massive repository for all our data. Our search results, our emails, contacts, backups, and more are mostly processed through the company’s services. Not everyone is embedded in Google’s services 100 percent, but most of us use at least one of its apps or online services, so having a place to put all of that information in perspective could be useful. That’s what the new Google About Me page is all about.

In a nutshell, it shows all of the information that is publicly available about you via various Google services. But better than that, it lets you control it. If you have a Google+ account, chances are your name, place of work, and picture will show up at the top, along with any other information you may have entered there.

Other information like your work history, contact details, and education are also likely to be listed, though they may feature one of several symbols by them. The green globe lets you know that anyone can find that information about you, whereas the linked red circles indicate that only those within your social circles can see it.

If you’d like to expand the amount of information that is available to select groups, you can do so by clicking the little plus symbol at the bottom, which gives you a few options for being more open with the world.

However, if you would rather circle your privacy wagons a little more, but aren’t sure where to start, there’s a “Privacy Checkup” tool that makes it that bit easier. It lists different aspects of your various profiles, which will be visible to the public and your circles of friends

While this new page may present a somewhat confusing change of pace for those used to fine tuning their settings with Google’s various tools, the hope is to simplify the process of changing privacy settings.

Mobile

The iPad Mini, Apple’s tiny tablet, makes a return with powerful specs

Apple has finally revealed the iPad Mini. With all-new and upgraded specs, support for the Apple Pencil, and a fantastically inclusive price, here's everything you need to know about the iPad Mini.
Computing

The Edge browser is dying. Here's what we know about its replacement

There's a new Microsoft Chromium browser coming, and it looks like it will be replacing Edge for most people. Here's everything you need to know about this new browser, how you can use it, and when it's expected to come out.
Mobile

How to use Samsung's Bixby assistant for all of your smartphone tasks

Samsung Bixby is a powerful tool, but not the most intuitive one we've encountered. Here's how to set up and use every feature of Samsung's digital assistant, as well as what to expect in the future.
Gaming

From Metal Coat to Sinnoh Stone, here's how to find special items in Pokémon Go

There are special items in Pokémon Go that can help your Pokémon evolve. The issue is they can be hard to find. Here's everything you need to know about special items, including where and how to get them.
Computing

Reluctant to give your email address away? Here's how to make a disposable one

Want to sign up for a service without the risk of flooding your inbox with copious amounts of spam and unwanted email? You might want to consider using disposable email addresses via one of these handy services.
Computing

Don't take your provider's word for it. Here's how to test your internet speed

If you're worried that you aren't getting the most from your internet package, speed tests are a great way to find out what your real connection is capable of. Here are the best internet speed tests available today.
Computing

Old Nvidia graphics cards to get ray tracing support in upcoming driver

Nvidia's RTX ray tracing technology will no longer be limited to RTX graphics cards. An upcoming driver update will add support for low-end ray tracing to GTX 10-series and 16-series graphics cards.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with six of the best PDF editors

Though there are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, finding a solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here are the best PDF editors for your editing needs, no matter your budget or operating system.
Computing

Apple iMac gets more powerful with new Intel CPUs, Radeon Pro graphics

Apple on Tuesday, March 19 refreshed its iMac lineup with new models featuring slightly more powerful Intel processors and new AMD graphics cards. The new 27-inch 5K model comes with options for Intel's six-core or eight-core ninth-gen…
Cars

Nvidia’s new simulator brings virtual learning to autonomous vehicle developers

Nvidia introduced a simulator for testing autonomous vehicle technologies. Drive Constellation is a cloud-based platform technology vendors can use to validate systems efficiently, safely, and much faster than with vehicles on real roads.
Photography

Paper designs digitize in real time using an Illustrator-connected paper tablet

Love graphic design, but prefer the feel of real paper? The new Moleskine Paper Tablet - Creative Cloud Connected syncs with Adobe Illustrator in real time, turning paper sketches into digital drawings.
Computing

Make the most of your toner with our five favorite color laser printers

Color laser printers have improved dramatically over the years, and today's models offer both blazing print speeds and great image quality. Here are our favorite color laser printers, from massive all-in-ones to smaller budget options.
Computing

Firefox 66 is here and it will soon block irritating autoplay videos

Do web advertisements have you frustrated? Mozilla is here to help. The latest version of the browser will soon block autoplaying videos by default and will also help make web page scrolling smoother.
Computing

USB4 will be the fastest and most uniform USB standard yet

USB4 is on the horizon and alongside a massive boost in speed it's also unifying with the Thunderbolt 3 standard to help finally create a singular wired connection protocol that all devices can enjoy.