This USB C monitor is as thin as paper and can go almost anywhere

Lapscreen USB-C monitor
Feytech

So far at CES 2019, there have been plenty of ultra-wide, ultra-high resolution monitors, and even an OLED gaming display. Well, for consumers who are looking for smaller solutions, there is the Lapscreen, a portable USB-C monitor that is as thin as paper and can go almost anywhere.

Part of an eight-year project, the seventh-generation Lapscreen monitor was invented by Michél Haese and packs in a length similar to a length of a U.S. letter. Its width is also the same size as an A4 piece of paper, with measurements of 4mm on the top and just 8mm on the bottom. As for the technical specifications, it comes in with an FHD resolution of 1,920 x 1,080, and both HDMI and USB-C signal in for a single audio and video connection with phones, tablets, and laptops.

That means you won’t need to fiddle with cables, but the portable monitor doesn’t doesn’t come with a kickstand, so it not exactly as compact as other displays like the Asus ZenScreen. There is a touchscreen version, though, which can pair up nicely for multitasking and inking in Windows 10.

Still, with 178-degree viewing angles, the possibilities for use on the road during travel can be endless. It is relatively light at 0.77 pounds, and can easily be slid into a laptop case or bag for travel to extend productivity when going to meetings, classes at school, or trades events. The inventor aptly refers to the Lapscreen as the “third evolution of mobile computing displays” for just that reason, mentioning it is compatible with a variety of cases, Wi-Fi dongles, batteries, and adapters.

Currently, the standard version of the Lapscreen can be purchased online from Faytech for prices starting at $200. The touchscreen version is a bit more expensive and can be purchased for $265, which is almost the same price as a regular monitor.

In previous years, there have been plenty of other portable monitors revealed at CES, including the AOC 17-inch display powered by a single USB cable. In 2016, there also was the NexDock, a second screen which offered a built-in keyboard and trackpad for connectivity with smartphones. For more, check out our picks of the best monitors of CES 2019 here.

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