TP-Link: food and shelter not as important as having Internet access

internet

Just how important is Internet access? If you had the choice to live in a mansion without Internet, or live in an apartment with Wi-FI, which would you choose? What about food? Would you eat ramen every night to keep your Wi-Fi running, or would you ditch the connection for a nice, juicy porterhouse steak? The answer might surprise you. According to a UK-based study done by TP-Link, a substantial amount of people believe their Internet access is more important than food or shelter.

TP-LinkStudyFirst off, this isn’t the entire world we’re talking about. The study was comprised of 3,000 men and women between the ages of 18 and 55 living in the U.K. and Ireland. Still, it gives us some pretty interesting insight into how people view Internet access in the modern era. According to the study, 50 percent of the individuals interviewed dedicated more time to the Internet than to food and sleep. Forty-two percent of the males interviewed stated that having an Internet connection was more important than food and shelter, although an “active love life” was still considered a top priority.

The test revealed some interesting societal-based results. According to the study, 51 percent of individuals improved friendships thanks to Internet access, while one quarter of the group reported feeling a better “sense of belonging.” However, you shouldn’t think the Internet will realistically help your love life; only 7 percent of those interviewed stated that the Web helped them find loving relationships.

One thing was made abundantly clear by the study: people don’t like to lose their access to the Internet. Of the 3,000 people interviewed, 82 percent stated that they felt anger and frustration when their Internet connection cut out or failed to connect. We’re sure you’ve all been there at some point though, especially when you really need to get something done and we get hit with that ever-so-ugly “webpage cannot be loaded” screen.

So what does this study prove? We live in a technology-driven world, one that is becoming increasingly more Web-based. This is a truth made more evident by other studies, like how our society receives its news. Smartphones and other mobile devices have unlocked our Internet access even more, allowing us to skim websites, social media outlets, and everything in between, on the go and without much restriction.

As stated before, this was just a sample of 3,000 people and should in no way reflect the opinion of all Internet users. Still, it’s pretty interesting to see how certain people view the Internet and it’s surprising how many people would choose a solidified Web connection over basic human necessities like food and shelter. What side of the fence do you find yourself on?

Photo via TP-Link

Smart Home

Cops go after porch pirates with dummy Amazon boxes and GPS trackers

Amazon is helping police in Jersey City to catch thieves who steal delivered packages from outside people's homes. Within just minutes of the operation's launch this week, cops nabbed their first porch pirate.
Emerging Tech

Are e-cigarettes safe? Here’s what the most recent science says

Ecigarettes are widely regarded and advertised as a healthier alternative to cigarettes for people who are trying to kick the smoking habit. How safe are these cigarette alternatives? We went deep into the recent scientific literature to…
Smart Home

Alexa’s latest skill helps patients manage high blood pressure

People who need some help managing their high blood pressure are getting some help via a new Alexa skill developed in partnership with Omron Healthcare that will work directly with the manufacturer's monitors.
Home Theater

Boy dies after being electrocuted through his headphones

A 16-year-old Malaysian boy appears to be the latest victim in a growing list of people who have been electrocuted by their smartphones via their headphones. It's believed that a faulty charging cable is the culprit.
Computing

Our favorite Chrome themes add some much-needed pizzazz to your boring browser

Sometimes you just want Chrome to show a little personality and ditch the grayscale for something a little more lively. Lucky for you, we've sorted through the Chrome Web Store to find best Chrome themes available.
Computing

Don't keep typing the same thing -- learn to copy and paste with these shortcuts!

Looking for useful Windows keyboard shortcuts? The most common are the cut, copy, paste and undo shortcuts compatible with all kinds of tasks. They can save you an awful lot of time if you learn how to use them.
Computing

Latest Facebook bug exposed up to 6.8 million users’ private photos

An API bug recently left an impact on Facebook users. Though the issue has since been fixed, some of the apps on the platform had a wrongful access to consumers photos for 12 days between September 13 and September 25. 
Computing

You can now get a Surface Laptop 2 for $800 at the Microsoft Store

Along with deals on other variants, starting configurations of Microsoft's Surface Laptop 2 are now going for $800 online at its retail store, cutting $200 from its usual $1,000 starting price. 
Computing

Need a monitor for professional photo-editing? These are the very best

Looking for the best monitor for photo editing? You'll need to factor in brightness, color accuracy, color gamut support and more. Fortunately, we've rounded up the best ones for you, to help you make an educated purchase.
Computing

HDR monitors are beginning to have an impact. Here are the best you can buy

HDR isn't the most common of PC monitor features and is often charged at a premium, but the list of available options is growing. These are the best HDR monitors you can buy right now.
Computing

You’ll soon be able to scribble all over PDFs on your Chromebook

Chrome OS users may soon be able to doodle all over their PDF documents with the possible addition of a new feature in Chrome OS' PDF viewer. The annotation feature is expected to allow users to hand draw or write over their documents.
Virtual Reality

Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive: Prices drop, but our favorite stays the same

The Oculus Rift and HTC Vive are the two big names in the virtual reality arena, but most people can only afford one. Our comparison tells you which is best when you pit the Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive.
Computing

Microsoft’s Windows 95 throwback was just an ugly sweater giveaway

Microsoft's "softwear" announcement wasn't what we had hoped for. Thursday's announcement was not the new line of wearable tech or SkiFree monster sweater we wished for. But it did deliver the 90s nostalgia we wanted.
Home Theater

Confused about LED vs. LCD TVs? Here's everything you need to know

Our LED vs. LCD TV buying guide explains why these two common types of displays are fundamentally connected, how they differ, what to look for in buying an LED TV, and what's on the horizon for TVs.