Security researcher discovers simple way to access Verizon ISP accounts

verizon vulnerability left millions of users at risk
A new report has been released which claims that armed with nothing more than a spoofed IP address and a phone number, anyone could access private customer information contained within the Verizon database.

The vulnerability was somehow discovered by BuzzFeed, of all places, which worked closely with Verizon to get the gap closed once they had a chance to evaluate the details of the breach.

The site received a tip-off from the CIO of the security firm Cinder, Eric Taylor, who had been testing the technique for a number of weeks before cluing BuzzFeed into the operation. The trick combines a minor amount of technical skill with classic social engineering tactics by spoofing an IP address of a Verizon customer, and then contacting the Verizon help center through the Internet provider’s website.

As long as the hacker has the phone number and address of their intended victim (something that’s easy to glean from emails or social engineering tactics), the Verizon chat center would automatically open the account as long as it detected that the IP address being used to connect matched up.

Verizon says it has a system in place designed to prevent this sort of problem from putting customers at risk, in the form of a PIN code that must be entered whenever a customer support representative is handing over sensitive information. The problem is this lock can be easily subverted as long as the hacker has access to an answer for one of the three security questions that are tied to a particular account.

According to Verizon, the error occurred due to a problem with the code of its website that was implemented on April 22nd, and has since been patched up after the company was contacted both by BuzzFeed and Taylor personally.

Computing

After fourth attack, hacker puts personal records of 26M people up for sale

A serial hacker going by the name of Gnosticplayers is selling the personal data of 26 million people who have been using the services of six different companies from across the world.
Computing

Reluctant to give your email address away? Here's how to make a disposable one

Want to sign up for a service without the risk of flooding your inbox with copious amounts of spam and unwanted email? You might want to consider using disposable email addresses via one of these handy services.
Mobile

Free yourself! How to unlock a phone from the icy hands of your wireless carrier

Do you want to know how to unlock a phone through your carrier or a third-party service like DoctorSIM? Regardless of which way you want to go, we've compiled a list of requirements and methods for doing so.
Deals

Here are the 5 of the best antivirus solutions for your small business

Getting your business off the ground is hard enough, and dealing with viruses, hackers, and security breaches only makes it harder. These 5 antivirus solutions can help keep you protected.
Computing

Nvidia’s smart paintbrush tool turns simple doodles into works of art

Nvidia has announced a new deep-learning-enhanced drawing app that can turn your doodles and sketches into highly realistic images. With Nvidia's GauGAN, simple sketches can be automatically embellished with more vivid details.
Computing

At $99, Nvidia’s Jetson Nano minicomputer seeks to bring robotics to the masses

Nvidia announced a new A.I. computer, the Jetson Nano. This computer comes with an 128-core GPU that Nvidia claims can handle pretty much any A.I. framework you could imagine. At $99, it's an affordable way for A.I. newbies to get involved.
Computing

Nvidia’s A.I. Playground lets you edit photos, experience deep learning research

Nvidia is making it easier to access information on deep learning research. It has launched an online space with three demos for image editing, styling, as well as photorealistic image synthesis. 
Computing

Amazon and Nvidia bring artificial intelligence to the cloud with T4 GPUs

Nvidia announced the availability of new mainstream servers optimized to run the company's latest T4 GPUs with Turning architecture. Amazon jumped on board immediately, announcing that new AWS EC2 G4 instances will offer the technology.
Computing

Calibrate your display to get it looking just the way you like it

Want to see images the way they're intended to be seen? Here is our quick guide on how to calibrate your monitor using your operating system or another tool, to make what's on the screen look as good as it can.
Computing

How to change your Gmail password in just a few quick steps

Regularly updating your passwords is a good way to stay secure online, but each site and service has their own way of doing it. Here's a quick guide on how to change your Gmail password in a few short steps.
Computing

Sending SMS messages from your PC is easier than you might think

Texting is a fact of life, but what to do when you're in the middle of something on your laptop or just don't have your phone handy? Here's how to send a text message from a computer, whether you prefer to use an email client or Windows 10.
Computing

Netgear’s new Nighthawk Tri-band AX12 router brings Wi-Fi 6 speeds to the masses

Available in May for $600, the Nighthawk Tri-band AX12 router allows for maximum Wi-Fi performance on smart home devices and offers everything needed for gaming, streaming, and other high-bandwidth applications. 
Home Theater

Smart speakers are about to get an IQ bump thanks to new Qualcomm chips

Qualcomm announced a new chipset that is designed to make the next generation of smart speakers sound, listen, and connect better than ever before, and it could soon be in your living room.
Computing

Don't take your provider's word for it. Here's how to test your internet speed

If you're worried that you aren't getting the most from your internet package, speed tests are a great way to find out what your real connection is capable of. Here are the best internet speed tests available today.