YouTube changes its strikes system, offers softer first-offense penalty

Youtube Webpage Stock Photo
Pixabay.com/Pexels

YouTube creators are well aware of what can happen if their content violates the video-sharing website’s guidelines. But it hasn’t always been clear what really counts as a violation.

YouTube hopes to clarify that and other aspects of its strikes system policy with new updates to that system.

Via a blog post published Tuesday, February 19, YouTube announced a series of new updates to its strikes system, which are expected to be in effect starting on February 25.

The updates include improvements to violation-related notifications, more consistent consequences for violations, and an expansion of policy resources to better educate content creators on how to avoid getting a strike in the first place.

The biggest change to hit the strike system, however, is the inclusion of a “warning” creators will now receive upon the first offense instead of a harsher first strike.

Once a creator’s content violates YouTube’s guidelines the first time, the creator will be issued a warning. The consequence that comes with getting a warning is just the removal of the offending content. No other penalties are assessed. After that, further violations will be addressed with the strikes system.

First strikes will involve a one-week freeze in which the creator won’t be able to upload new content. Second strikes will result in two-week content publishing freezes. And if content creators make it to a third strike, their channels will be terminated. These penalties will be enforced no matter the type of offense.

It is worth noting, however, while warnings come with a less severe consequence, they cannot be “reset” after 90 days, as a strike can.

In addition to issuing warnings, YouTube will also send email and desktop notifications with “more details on which policy was violated” in an effort to better inform creators about the strikes, the consequences, “and the next steps that are available.” Similar notifications are also expected to be available in-product and on mobile platforms as well.

A softer first-offense penalty, better notifications, and more consistent consequences across the board may help clarify YouTubes guidelines and expectations, but as Engadget notes, the changes may do little to quell complaints of perceived content moderation-related biases YouTube is accused of having.

Product Review

Price be damned, the OnePlus 7 Pro is bigger and faster than ever before

OnePlus has delivered its biggest, and fastest smartphone ever in the OnePlus 7 Pro. It’s also more expensive than before, with a $750 price tag hanging from the most technically impressive model.
Gaming

These are the must-have games that every Xbox One owner needs

More than four years into its life span, Microsoft's latest console is finally coming into its own. From Cuphead to Halo 5, the best Xbox One games offer something for players of every type.
Gaming

Doom, Wolfenstein, and more are sure bets for the Bethesda E3 conference

Bethesda will once again host its own press conference at E3 2019. The Bethesda E3 Showcase is sure to feature new game announcements. Here's how to watch the Bethesda press conference and what to expect.
Home Theater

Spotify is quietly turning itself into a storytelling platform for artists

As it seeks to protect its gains in subscribers and provide more ways for artists and creators to engage with audiences, Spotify is testing out its own version of the popular Stories format with a new feature called Storyline.
Computing

Is Threadripper dead? If so, AMD has made a huge mistake

Think Threadripper is dead? Think again. AMD's flagship CPU line might not be on this year's roadmap, but it's not dead and could well bring some amazing new enhancements when it returns.
Social Media

6 easy ways to archive all of your favorite Instagram videos

Saving Instagram videos should be just as easy as taking a screenshot. So, we've put together a list of the best apps and tools that save your favorite Instagram videos onto your phone or computer.
Product Review

Microsoft’s Surface Laptop 2 launched last year, but already feels old

Released in fall of 2018, the Surface Laptop 2 was competitive at the time but now must deal with new competitors that were announced at CES 2019. How does the popular Surface Laptop 2 hold up six months later?
Computing

Cybercrime gang that stole $100M busted in international effort

A major cybercrime gang that used powerful malware to steal an estimated $100 million from bank accounts has been dismantled following an international effort that spanned six countries.
Computing

G-Sync is a game-changer. These are the best monitors with Nvidia's display tech

Looking for a monitor that plays well with Nvidia GPUs? You need G-Sync and we have picked the best G-Sync monitors available. Take a look and find out which monitor works best for your PC upgrade.
Computing

Microsoft is discounting this Surface Laptop 2 by a sweet $300

Microsoft is offering a nearly 14-inch Surface Laptop 2 with 256GB of storage at a $300 discount until May 18, 2019. The laptop comes with a PixelSense display, and Intel Core i5 processor and a 720p HD camera.
Product Review

Looking for discrete graphics on the cheap? The Acer Swift 3 will do the trick

The Acer Swift 3 is a tweener laptop that’s not quite budget and not quite premium – and it feels and performs accordingly. It manages to hold its own, though, thanks to its discrete GPU.
Computing

The Razer Core X Chroma is the best external GPU you can buy

The third entry in Razer's lineup of external graphics card enclosures, the Core X Chroma, brings together the best of its previous options in a single package. With RGB lighting and extra USB ports, is this the best you can buy?
Computing

Google recalls Titan Security Key due to hijack risk

Google is offering a free replacement for the Bluetooth Low Energy version of the Titan Security Key. A misconfiguration was discovered in the device, though hackers looking to exploit the vulnerability will find it difficult to do so.
Computing

Whether you want to edit, sign, or append, PDFs, these are the best PDF editors

While there are plenty of PDF editor options online, finding a solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here are the best PDF editors for your editing needs, no matter your budget or operating system.