Skip to main content

2025 Tech: Everyday gadgets and gizmos in your near future

vehicle_displays_hud
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Forget about flying cars – what about a television that senses when you have walked into the room and starts playing your favorite show? Or a washing machine that knows a red sock from a white sock? In the future, a higher degree of personalization that specifically matches your tastes, increased artificial intelligence that can think faster than you, and incredibly fast processing will be the norm. To find out what tech will be like in 2025, we tapped product designers and futurists to see what they predict will eventually replace the iPhone — or at least compete with the new iPhone 11 model.

Entertainment sensors know your tastes

The Microsoft Kinect is an early peek at how entertainment will work in the future, says Rick Chin, the director of innovation at the product design software company SolidWorks (www.solidworks.com). In 2025, your television will not just sense that you have walked into the room, it will use multiple sensors that identify everyone in the room using facial recognition and body-shape tracking sensors, then immediately start playing the shows you recorded or that you normally like to watch.

Samsung-RF4289-displayYour washing machine will think for you

Smart appliances like the Samsung RF4289 Smart Refrigerator let you jot down notes to family members and run apps on an LCD screen. But appliances in 2025 will be even smarter, says Urlich Eberl, a senior director at Siemens AG (www.siemens.com). He says your washing machine will know what you have loaded, set the time and detergent automatically, and even let you know if you have a red sock mixed in with the whites. Of course, they will also run only during times of the day when energy is cheapest.

Auto HUD shows the weather forecast

Vehicles like the 2011 Chevy Corvette Grand Sport show a heads-up display (HUD) that emanates off the front of the car to show current speed and even the song playing on the stereo. Yet, MicroVision (www.microvision.com) has announced it is working with “a major automaker” to create a next-gen HUD using PicoHUD technology. The idea is that a color screen would emanate on the dash or in the windshield, showing much more detail: a weather forecast, navigation, or even a movie.

Machine-to-machine (M2M) sensors in everything

Tiny sensors will be embedded into everything around us, says Mike Ueland, a vice president and GM at Telit (www.telit.com), a company that makes the M2M sensors. This will include everything from picture frames to dog collars, pill bottle caps to the car in your garage, and even your own body. Parking meters will send data over wireless connection directly to the city. Ueland says there are already early signs of this: A sensor in a car that feeds data about how you drive to the insurance company. Yet, by 2025, he predicts that just about everything will have an embedded sensor.

Autonomous cars drive you home

Google has recently completed tests with a fleet of Toyota Prius cars that drive around Northern California on their own as a driver monitors the AI routines. Volkswagen announced a “temporary auto pilot” technology that works like adaptive cruise control in sensing the road, other cars, and lane markings. You’ll engage the setting and can catch up on your e-mail while the car does the driving. Yet, by 2025, autonomous driving on some roads will be routine, says Chin. Long-range sensors will improve to the point where they work like the radars in high-tech planes.

Organic lights in the ceiling  Eberl also predicts that organic LED lights (OLED) will become more ubiquitous. Today, LED lights like the Switch (www.switchlightbulbs.com) are just as bright as an incandescent bulb, but can last for a decade. In 2025, new OLED lights will mimic sunlight – many home builders will install them into the ceiling as track lighting. They will last just as long as LED lights, but shine with a more natural glow.Organic lights in the ceiling

Eberl also predicts that organic LED lights (OLED) will become more ubiquitous. Today, LED lights like the Switch (www.switchlightbulbs.com) are just as bright as an incandescent bulb, but can last for a decade. In 2025, new OLED lights will mimic sunlight – many home builders will install them into the ceiling as track lighting. They will last just as long as LED lights, but shine with a more natural glow.

Home diagnosis with remote telemedicine

High-def videoconferencing is one thing, but Intel is developing new technology for telemedicine where, by 2025, you may not have to go the doctor for a diagnosis. Instead, the doctor will chat with you on a video call and ask questions, check a wound, or even prescribe medicine based on symptoms he or she observes. Interestingly, telemedicine will have several side benefits: lower costs, better accuracy in diagnosis (because doctors will follow a set of procedures developed specifically for the remote sessions), or more frequent check-ins.

Buy anything with your phone

A few smartphones like the Google Nexus use near-field communication to conduct transactions, but only if the retailer is set up to accept those payments. By 2025, phones will become the only way to pay for services and products, says Ueland. Call them “super smartphones” in that they will not only pay for all transactions – airline fees, food, and even your utility bill – but these more advanced devices will finally replace every other gadget you might carry: say, a digital camera or even your laptop.

John Brandon
Former Digital Trends Contributor
This AI cloned my voice using just three minutes of audio
acapela group voice cloning ad

There's a scene in Mission Impossible 3 that you might recall. In it, our hero Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) tackles the movie's villain, holds him at gunpoint, and forces him to read a bizarre series of sentences aloud.

"The pleasure of Busby's company is what I most enjoy," he reluctantly reads. "He put a tack on Miss Yancy's chair, and she called him a horrible boy. At the end of the month, he was flinging two kittens across the width of the room ..."

Read more
Digital Trends’ Top Tech of CES 2023 Awards
Best of CES 2023 Awards Our Top Tech from the Show Feature

Let there be no doubt: CES isn’t just alive in 2023; it’s thriving. Take one glance at the taxi gridlock outside the Las Vegas Convention Center and it’s evident that two quiet COVID years didn’t kill the world’s desire for an overcrowded in-person tech extravaganza -- they just built up a ravenous demand.

From VR to AI, eVTOLs and QD-OLED, the acronyms were flying and fresh technologies populated every corner of the show floor, and even the parking lot. So naturally, we poked, prodded, and tried on everything we could. They weren’t all revolutionary. But they didn’t have to be. We’ve watched enough waves of “game-changing” technologies that never quite arrive to know that sometimes it’s the little tweaks that really count.

Read more
Digital Trends’ Tech For Change CES 2023 Awards
Digital Trends CES 2023 Tech For Change Award Winners Feature

CES is more than just a neon-drenched show-and-tell session for the world’s biggest tech manufacturers. More and more, it’s also a place where companies showcase innovations that could truly make the world a better place — and at CES 2023, this type of tech was on full display. We saw everything from accessibility-minded PS5 controllers to pedal-powered smart desks. But of all the amazing innovations on display this year, these three impressed us the most:

Samsung's Relumino Mode
Across the globe, roughly 300 million people suffer from moderate to severe vision loss, and generally speaking, most TVs don’t take that into account. So in an effort to make television more accessible and enjoyable for those millions of people suffering from impaired vision, Samsung is adding a new picture mode to many of its new TVs.

Read more