Cubibot brings affordable 3D printing to the masses

3D printing is no longer reserved for the highly affluent or highly technical. Just about anyone can experience the magic of this 21st century printing technique, thanks to the team behind Cubibot, And now that the barriers to entry have been eliminated, demand is clearly very high. Just half an hour after launching its Kickstarter campaign, Cubibot raised more than $150,000, and at this point, has already raised more than $500,000 from nearly 1,700 backers.

Part of the appeal of the Cubibot, of course, is its accessible entry price point of $149. But not only will it spare your savings account, it also won’t take up a lot of space on your countertop. Heralded as the world’s most compact 3D printer, the Cubibot boasts cloud-printing capabilities, a heated bed, and of course, a companion mobile app.

“We’ve been perfecting Cubibot for over two and a half years to achieve a smarter, safer and easier-to-use personal product that makes 3D printing accessible to the masses and it does not require 3D printing expertise,” according to Aria Noorazar, Co-founder of Cubibot, which is based in the San Diego Innovation Center. “If you can set up and use a regular printer, you can use Cubibot.”

The countertop device, which fits onto virtually any tabletop, boasts a host of features that make it suitable for first time printers and experts alike. For example, there’s a fully automated smart self-leveling build platform; the ability to print in PLAs, ABS, nylon, and other materials; an easily accesible web-based platform; a high-temperature nozzle; and plug-n-print capabilities, which means all you need to do to operate the Cubibot is plug it in and click on print.

The Cubibot prints in resolutions of between 50 and 300 microns, with print speeds of up to 80 millimeters per second. The machine comes loaded with CubiSoft, the web-based software that allows for an easy out-of-the-box experience. Simply design within CubiSoft and hit print for your design to come to life.

“We hope to give people the freedom to create their designs whether they’re already 3D printer pros or if they’re completely new to 3D printing,” Noorazar said. “We invite the existing 3D printing community and newcomers who would want to support our mission to bring easy-to-use, compact, safe, remote, smart, and affordable 3D printing to the masses.”

Shipment is anticipated for February 2018.

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