Ever see a chip implanted in someone? One of our own puts his body on the line

When you want to find out the latest on emerging technologies, you turn to Digital Trends’ Cool Tech editor Drew Prindle. And when you need a guinea pig to try out those same technologies — no matter the pain required — well, Prindle’s there for that, too.

As those who watched Digital Trends’ live-stream saw, Prindle sat down with Dangerous Things founder Amal Graafstra to discuss his work on implants, which could provide a variety of functionality and make all kinds of things — from safety locks for guns to work badges — a thing of the past.

We’ll warn you: The process requires an exceptionally large needle (it’ll seem especially large to those who are not fans of needles). But according to Prindle, it only feels like a bad hornet sting, and there was little if any discomfort afterward. “I’ll be able to wave my hand in front of the door to get in the office,” he quipped after both those on YouTube, Facebook Live, and dozens of shocked onlookers had gathered themselves from what they witnessed.

Graafstra stands behind his products and also their safety. Just like the implantable jewelry that has become all the rage in body piercing in recent years, Dangerous Things’ implant is 100-percent safe and causes no issues. Graafstra should know: he has five different chips — including a large one on the top of his arm that was the prototype for all his work.

“After a few weeks it becomes a part of you,” he said. “Eventually you don’t even realize it’s there.”

But why, you ask? The possibilities are endless. Prindle is going to use it to replace his work badge for access to Digital Trends’ office, for starters. But just about anything that uses RFID and NFC can be copied onto the implantable chip — and it has high-grade security to prevent hacking or spoofing, too.

The kits are available from Dangerous Things starting at $99, which include all you need to perform the process yourself. However, Graafstra strongly discourages that and is working with body piercers across the country to have its implant injected in a safe and hygienic way.

Digital Trends is live all week at CES 2017 in Las Vegas. Check out our continuing coverage live on YouTube, Facebook, #DTces, and DigitalTrends.com/ces/.

Product Review

It's not a spy, but you still won't want to friend Facebook's Portal+

Facebook has jumped into the smart home game with the Portal+, a video-calling device featuring an Amazon Alexa speaker and a screen. While it has lots of cool calling features, we’re weary of Facebook taking up counter space in our home.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Nissan turmoil, product designer Jae Yoo of Nerf, and more

For today's episode of Digital Trends Live, we turn our attention to the L.A. Auto Show and Lamborghini's race-ready version of the Urus. We also speak with Jae Yoo of Nerf and MLS defender Zarek Valentin about their origins, modern tech…
Digital Trends Live

Nerf product designer has his sights set on upcoming ‘Overwatch’ collaboration

Nerf has a new line of Overwatch tie-in guns coming out in 2019, and Product Design Manager Jae Yoo appeared on Digital Trends Live to talk about the collaboration, and how he comes up with designs.
Emerging Tech

Warm up or cool down with the press of a button on the wrist-worn Embr

We review the Embr Wave, a personal heating and cooling wearable designed by a team of MIT engineers that’s now on Kickstarter. Our thoughts? It’s a little bit addictive.
Emerging Tech

Ancient crater the size of NYC discovered under the Greenland ice sheet

A huge crater has been discovered beneath the ice of Greenland, and is thought to be the result of a meteorite impact millions of years ago. The crater is one of the largest ever discovered, measuring 19 miles across.
Emerging Tech

Here’s how the InSight mission to Mars will confirm its landing to NASA

NASA's InSight mission has sent a lander to Mars. NASA researchers have now shared details on how they will monitor the touching down of the lander at the end of its 91 million mile journey.
Emerging Tech

Would you swap your keycard for a microchip implant? For many, the answer is yes

Put down your keycard! More people are turning to implanted RFID chips as their choice of workplace identification. Should we be worried about a world in which employees get microchipped?
Outdoors

‘Super magnesium’ may be the next wonder material for outdoor gear

Super Magnesium is a wonder material that is 30 percent lighter than aluminum, as strong as carbon fiber, cheaper to make, and 100-percent recyclable, making it much better for the environment.
Emerging Tech

Forget joysticks — the Guts Game is controlled by a sensor that you swallow

Researchers have created an unusual new game in which players swallow a biosensor and then compete to raise or lower the temperature in their gut. Sound crazy? Here's why it could catch on.
Emerging Tech

Step inside the Nepalese restaurant staffed by robot waiters

A robotics startup from Nepal has created a robot waiter called Ginger. It's capable of delivering food from kitchen to table, and can even engage customers in a bit of friendly banter as it does so.
Emerging Tech

Doctors could soon ditch stitches and seal skin wounds with lasers

Just like the dermal regenerator in Star Trek, physicians may soon be able to heal skin wounds using smart, laser-based technology. That's thanks to researchers from Arizona State University.
Emerging Tech

From tornado flushes to remote controls, modern toilets are flush with tech

With the global observance of World Toilet Day on November 19, we take a look at how the modern toilet in our homes and businesses have evolved, and how they are becoming smarter tools in the future.
Emerging Tech

NASA selects the all-important landing site for its Mars 2020 rover mission

NASA said on Monday that the landing site for its much-anticipated Mars 2020 rover mission has the potential to "revolutionize how we think about Mars and its ability to harbor life."
Emerging Tech

NASA’s ‘space wheat’ is helping earthbound farmers grow crops quicker

Could NASA technology for growing plants on other planets help farmers improve crop yield here on Earth? According to researchers in Australia and the U.K., the answer is a resounding yes.